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UNITPn STATES 



TMl<^ SID E OF" CARD 

Brlggs, Nellie 



Mrs. H. N. Chandler 
Suite 209. Pelham Hall 
1284 Beacon St. 
Brookline, Mass. 



95-55 
693 




WE THOUGHT YOU'D LIKE TO KNOW 

the ground has just been broken for this 

new science and classroom building! 

Why don't you come back to campus and visit some day? 

^^. LASELL ALUMNAE, INC. 



Lesley Anne Whittemore 



50 Kevin Joe's Way • Wrentham, Massachusetts 02093 • (508) 384-3998 



September 23, 2002 



Alumni Office 

Lasell College 

1844 Commonwealth Avenue 

Newton, MA 02466 

Dear Sir or Madam, 

Enclosed please find an 1896 '' Allerlei" yearbook that I came across recently while 
going through some family belongings. My aunt, Marjorie Billings, was an alumna of 
Lasell College (1928?), and apparently a friend of hers had given her this yearbook to 
look at but requested it be given to Lasell (see note inside front cover). I have to say my 
aimt was pretty organized, so Fm not sure how this got by her. However, I thought I 
would send this along for Lasell's archives, albeit 50 or so years later! 

Sincerely, 



Li iOkth' 



Lesley A. Whittemore 



"^ 




L A S E L L 

COLLEGE 



Office of Institutional Advancement 



Tel: 617.243.2141 
Fax: 617.243.2142 



October 4, 2002 



Ms. Lesley Whittemore 
50 Kevin Joe's Way 
Wrentham, MA 02093 

Dear Ms. Whittemore: 

Thank you so much for the wonderful addition of the 1896 Lasell Allerlei 
yearbook to the Lasell College Archives! We have your aunt, Marjorie Billings, listed as 
a member of the class of 1 929. 

Your thoughtfulness is greatly appreciated. 



Thanks again. 



Sincerely, 




t- 



MjW 



Karen B. Gill 

Director of Alumni Affairs 

alumni@lasell.edu 



A Leader In Innovative Education Since 1851. 

■ 
1844 Commonwealth Avenue Newton, Massachusetts 02166-2716 

■ 
www.iasell.edu 



Sept. 20. School began. 
Sept. 22. Reception for the new students. 



NOYE S BROTH ERS. 

MPW QUIRTINR^ Now ready. French Madias, English Oxfords and Scotch Cheviots. For Men's Negligee and 
ULU OninimOO Outing shirts; for Ladies and Children's Waists and Blouses, or sol'd by the yard at NOYES 

BROS. 
FflR I AfllF^ ^^® nialve to order and guarantee perfect satisfaction in the style and lit of Ladies' Blouse Waists, 
run LHUILO Negligee and Tennis Shirts. Prices, $3.75 to $16.50, according to quality of shirting selected. 

LADIES' WAISTS, SHIRTS, BLOUSES, 

SKIRTS, JACKETS, 

OUTSIDE GARMENTS, DRESSES, 

FROM WASH MATERIALS. 

SERGE SUITS, BLACK and NAVY BLUE CHEVIOT SUITS, ULSTERS 
and INVERNESS CAPES. All made to Special Measure. 

Samples and full instructions sent on application. 




DRESS AND BUSINESS SHIRTS $1.50, $2.00 AND UP. 



NoYES Brothers, 



WASHINGTON AND SUMMER STREETS, 

BOSTON, MASS., U.S.A. 



CADEMIC aHUSIC. 



A CADEMIC lyi 



"COLLEGE SONGS." 

Most popular college collection ever published. Over 300,000 sold. 
Heavy Paper, .50 cents; Cloth, Gilt, Sl.OO. 

** fiexxx HaPVaPd Song^Book." 

Including all the newest Harvard songs. Heavy Paper, SSI. 00. 

''College Songs for Girls." 

As sung in the leading colleges for women. Heavy Paper, $1.00. 



Bootfs Album of Songs." 



A new collection of line lyrical songs, by the author of "Here's a. 
Health to King Charles," which is included. $1.00. 

Any book sent postpaid on receipt of price. 
Send for bulletins of the new vocal and instrumental music. 

OLIVER DITSON COMPANY, 

453-463 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON. 

C. H. DITSON &, CO., N. Y. 

(2) 

Sept. 24. New students very popular among the clubs. 
Sept. 26. Memorial service for Mrs. Latiner. 



Sept. 27. Bakery man appeared. 
Sept. 29. Members of Canoe Club went to band concert on the Charles. 



SEASONABLE 
GARMENTS 

IN 

GREAT 
VARIETY, 



^ 




CORRECT 

STYLES. 

REASONABLE 

PRICES. 



# 



^be Cloak /llbanutacturers, 

600 Washington St., cor. Bedford St., Boston. 

Notwithstanding the numerous flattering advertisennents of bargains or markdowns 
offered on every side, we confidently assert Our Regular Prices to be as low as can be 
found in any cloak house or cloak department in the United States. 



FASHIONABLE 
CAPES, 

COATS, 



TAILOR=MADE 

OUTING SUITS, 

SEPARATE DRESS SKIRTS, 



JACKETS, 

SILK WAISTS, 
SKIRTS, 



DUCK SUITS, 

LAUNDERED WAISTS, 
FUR CAPES, Etc. 



The distinctive features of our goods are elegance in 

STYLE, FIT and FINISH. 

Heaiparters for FasMonaMe Cloab ai Laflies' Oiitsifle Garments 



■^/"\y"\>'N-' 



OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



Discount to Teachers and Students of all the Leading Educational Institutions. 

(3) 



Oct. 5. Lecture on India. 
Oct. 8. Girls went to Concord. 



Oct. 10. Leland Powers here. 
Oct. 15. Girls went to Cambridge and Newport. 

The Boston and Albany R. R. 



Has the best through car service from New 



England to the commercial centres of the 



West; and is the only line running through 



cars via 



New York Central & Hudson River R. R., 

Lake Sliore & Michigan Southern Ry., 
Big Four Route ( C. C. C. & St. L. Ry.), and 



Michigan Central R. R., 



(Passing in full view of Niagara Palls.) 



■^- 



?trains IDestibuleb. 



Dining Car Service. 



% 

^ 



IVING Tourists the benefit of a through 
service without requiring the prepayment 
Complete ^brOU^b 4iP of ^ sufficient sum to cover all expenses con- 
tingent on a trip of several weeks or months' 
duration. Passage and berth tickets only being 
required, all other expenses while in transit or 
sojourning in the West are left discretionary with the traveler, who is thus enabled to 
go and come at pleasure, patronizing such hotels and lines as may best suit his 
convenience. 

(4) 



Oct. 17. Shakespeare lectures began. 
Oct. 30. Somebody had a spread. 



Oct. 31. Hallowe'en party in gym. 
Nov. 15, Colored men sang. 



Cobb, Aldrich, & Co. 



The Elegant New Store, 



Washington and 



Kneeland Streets. 



OITUATED in the corner of our elegant new store between the two main entrances 
^ is our Confectionery Department, which is one of the largest and the hand- 
somest of any in this city. This is fully stocked with 

ppesl7 ©opfectiorpep^ 



of all kinds of the finest French Candies, including Nougatines, Bavarian, St. Nicholas, 

Montevideo, Nanon, Operas, Chocolate -Covered Caramels, Opera Caramels, 

Crystallized French Fruits, etc. Also the more common kinds. 

All of which are strictly and absolutely pure, 

and sold at moderate prices. 



The Finest Grocery Store in America. 



COBB, ALDRICH, & CO., 
BOSTON. 




(5) 



Nov. 16. Mr. Bixby lectured. 
Nov, 21. Bro>vn University gave a concert here. 



N 


Nov, 24. Missionary Festival, 
ov. 26. 85 went to Sousa's band. 




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NVV/'-u/- Vx V/" V/' Six NV'\j(>'\jlx\jl/'\v'\i/' v/" WWWSVV/' V/'— -''^? 


Whitney's 






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Handkerchiefs, 






lp^mbroit)eri5 (Tlotbs, anb 



Silf^ ant) Xtnen jfloeses 



uset) in lEmbroibering, 





N.B.-WE MAKE A DISCOUNT IN PRICES ON 
WEDDING OUTFITS. 



10 



TEMPLE PLACE, 



BOSTON. 



(6) 



Nov. 29. Thanksgiving Day. 



Dec. I. Girls crazy over the Yale-Princeton game. 
Dec. 4. Girls went to Melba. 

L. P. Hollander & Co. 

BOSTON: Boylston St. and Park Sq. NEWPORT: Casino Building. 
NEW YORK: 290 Fifth Ave. PARIS OFFICE: 21 Rue Bergere. 



Order Dc^aKhfxcht^ : 

Costumes, 
Riding Habits^ 
Coats, 
Millinery. 



\^; 


♦ 


vSji/ 


* 




♦ 




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♦ 




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•: Capes, Coats, 

> Travelling Wraps, 

•I Graduating Dresses, 

I Outing ^^ Party Dresses, 

{ Trimmed Hats. 

M 



GLOVES. — Our Special Makes. 

LADIES' UNDERWEAR. 

New England Agents for FASSO CORSETS. 



mu(v 



Pine Dress Goods in Exclusive Designs. 



IS 



Special Discount of 10% in all Ready- Made Departments to Students and 

Instructors of Lasell Seminary. 

OUR HOUSE /S CELEBRATED FOR ITS DISTINCTIVE TASTE AND LEADING 

IDEAS ON FASHIONS. 

(7) 



Dec. 6. Fair at Methodist Church. 



Dec. 13. Pupils' Concert. 
Dec. 19. School out for three weeks. 



O. A. JENKINS & CO., 

3furrier6 
Xabic6' Ibattere. 



Mm 




EXCLUSIVE STYLES IN ENGLISH 
TURBANS, ROUND HATS, AND 
ENGLISH WALKING HATS. 




CORRECT STYLES IN HIGH GRADE 


SAILOR 


: HATS. 




HATS 


SUITABLE FOR 


TRAVEL= 


LING, 


STEAMER AND 


SEASIDE 


WEAR. 








'WW 





Furs stored and insured, also repaired during the Summer months. 



407 WASHINGTON STREET, 
BOSTON. 

CS) 



Jan. 9. School in again. 



VOLUJVIE V 



AUBURNDALE, MASSACHUSETTS 

1895 




10 
00 



/^eCEI^tEl 




EDWARD LASELL, 

ProfEssar of Chemi'^lrij, lUiHisms Callege, 
FOUNDER OF LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, MASS. 




CHARLES C. BRAGDON, 

Present Principal, 



Dedication. 



i} 



OT few booKs l:\ave gorie before t]:\is 
Out irito tY[e World so cold ; 
Yet tt)ey Wer|t Witt} rio protectior], 
fis tl|ey felt bott| strorig aqd bold. 



Tfjis, our first arid sirqple booKlet, 
Witl) its pages yet ilriread, 

Weeds a steady arrr] to l\elp it 
O'er tl|e patl|s it soori rqiist tread, 

So our worK is dedicated, 

Tl\oUgl\ a Tqytfi ttiey riow do seerq, 
To our future lords arid rqasters, 

Of wt\orq, yet, We cari but drearq, 

Ho, ye rqigrity rqeri of Valor 1 

If ye seeK out as a Wife 
Orie of '96's iT\aideris, 

Tl\is rqUst be tliy airT\ ii] life, — 

To protect, fronq all tl^e dangers 

Wtiict] assail, ^ler flllerlei, 

flrid tlius Win for it a future, 

. fl reriowri ttiat caririot die, 

(14) 



96 




M. M. SCHUBERTH. F. A. Ray. 

B. L. Kelley. H. M. Holman 
I>. P. Hubbard. 

V. S. Ellison. M. B. Cruikshank. 

I. E. Bronson. 
R. M. French. B. Bailey. 

L. M. HiBBERD. 



C. A. Sawin. J. E. Hammond. 
A. W. Clarke. E. F. Ampt. 

G. P. Englehart. K. S. Pennell. 

B. S. Hayward. a. F. Gushing. 

M. E. Avery. 
J. Tui-LEYS. M. M. Johnson. 

E. V. Watkins. 



N. A. Carnahan. 
C. E. Googins. S. B. Hayward. E. D. Loud. A. J. Hackett. 

M. E. JossELYN. J. B. Chandler. E. \V. Wilson. J. E. Fitch. H. P. Fitch 



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Preface. 




7n\HE Editors would omit writing an introduction to their AUerlei, 
if they did not fear that a book without a preface would be 
regarded in the light of a girl making her first appearance 
in society without a chaperone. Therefore it is merely to 
properly introduce our Allerlei, and save it from all unkind 
criticism, that we devote a page to this uninteresting chaperone. If 
you fail to be introduced to our book until thoroughly acquainted 
with its contents, the chaperone will fail to fill her one office. 

We cannot begin to tell you the time and weary labor which we 
have spent on this, our first book. Many things we would gladly 
improve, but as they cannot now be remedied we submit all to your 
consideration, and yes, we will say kind criticism. 

Once or twice we have been so discouraged that we felt almost 
inclined to give up the whole undertaking; but all that is now past, 
and we leave it to you, dear reader, to decide whether we did wisely 
in refusing to let these discouragements kill our book in its infancy. 

Before it is too late we beg the pardon of our younger school- 
mates who have seemed so bored and inconvenienced by our many 

" Editors' Meetings," and can only say that we would advise them to 

(19) 



have more meetings than their older sisters, when they have such 
important business to transact. 

We heartily thank those friends who have helped us so much 
with their kind sympathy, and hope that in some way we may be able 
to repay them. 

Our work is done, that drudging work ; 

Our troubles now are o'er; 
We lay our pen and ink aside, 

To tax our minds no more. 




( 20) 



5oard of Trci^tee^. 



Rev. Wm. R. Clark, D.D., 

Rev. C. Parkhurst, D.D., 
Prof. Jules Lu qui ens 
C. C. Bragdon, 

Mrs. C. C. Bragdon. 



PacQlt^. 



CHARLES C. BRAGDON, M.A., 
Principal. 

Consiiiiition of United States and 
Political Economy. 

CAROLINE A. CARPENTER, 

Assistant Piincipal. 
English Literature and History. 

DELIA M. STRONG, 

Preceptress. 
Manners and Dress. 

GEORGE M. STEELE, D.D., 
Pastor. 
Bible, Etiiics, Psychology. 

WILLIAM J. ROLFE, M.A., 
Shakespeare. 

MARY P. WITHERBEE, 

English. 

ELLEN H. CURIIS, 

Mathematics. 



HERBERT LOWELL RICH, Ph.B., 
Natural Sciences. 

PAULA VON DER KALL, 
German. 

JEANNE Le ROYER, 
French. 

ADALINE W. ALLEN, 
Latin and Greek. 



CORA E. EVERETT, 
Reading. 



MARTHA A. RANSOM, 

Physical Culture and Swimming. 

BLANCHE BEMIS, 
KATE ADAMS, 

Gymnasium Assistants. 



ANNIE P. CALL, 
Nerve Training. 



(22) 



Major GEORGE H. BENYON, 
Military Drill. 

JOSEPH A. HILLS, 
Piano-forte. 

J. WALTER DAVIS, 

Voice Culture and Chorus Singing. 

S. E. GOLDSTEIN, 

Violin. 

KATE E. PLUMMER, 



ADELINE L. ADAMS, 
History of Art. 



Organ. 


Typewriting. 


GEORGIA PRAY, 


SUSAN TRUE, 


Violoncello. 


Dress-cutting 


LOUISE PUTNAM, 


ADELE B. LEWIS, 


Guitar and Mandolin. 


Millinery. 


FRANK PARTRIDGE, 


MARY L. NUTT, 


Cornet. 


Nurse. 



ANNA BARROWS, 
Cooking. 



ANGELINE C. BLAISDELL, 
Book-keeping. 

WILLIAM D. BRIDGE, 

Phonography. 

EMILY H. GENN, 



HENRY ORNE RYDER, 

Drawing and Painting. 



HELEN B. MORRIS, 
Assistant in Laboratory. 



(23) 



Classes 



'<^6 "L^t all greeK tl)^iKg5 praise tKe Lordl." 



Pre5l)man Cla55. 



Motto : " On a rien pour rien." 



Class Color : Green and White. Class Flower : Maiden-hair Fern and White Rose. 



Marie Wilson . 


President. 






Margaret Gere 


Vice-President. 


Laura Chapman . 


Secretary. 


Emily Warner . 


Treasurer. 


Names. 


Residences. Rooms. 


Clarissa Arnold . . . . . 


Unadilla, N.Y 32 


Martha Baker .... 


Jamaica, West Indies 






74 


Ada Cadmus, S.D. 


Jersey City, N.J. 






43 


Kittiebel Chapman, Lasellia 


Elgin, 111. 






36 


Laura A. Chapman, Lasellia 


Elgin, 111. 






36 


P^lse Doepke .... 


Cincinnati, Ohio 






23 


Sadie P'arnsworth 


Council Bluffs, Iowa 






12 


Margaret Gere, Lasellia 


Sioux City, Iowa 






22 


Marie Griswold, Lasellia 


Columbus, Wis. 








Maybell Hart .... 


Westerly, R.L 






26 


Alice Kimball, Lasellia 


Presque Isle, Me. . 






18 


Maud Mayo, Lasellia . 


Foxcroft, Me. 






56 


Ruth Merriam .... 


Meriden, Conn. 






19 


Susan Montgomery, Lasellia 


Philadelphia, Penn. 






41 


Jennie Myrick .... 


Yarmouthport, Mass. 






14 


Ellen Siedentopf, Lasellia . 


Council Bluffs, Iowa 






62 


Emily Warner, Lasellia 


Detroit, Mich. 






15 


Marie Wilson, Lasellia 


New York, N.Y. . 
(27) 






• 38 



Ci^SS Mistor>^, '95. 




LTHOUGH the illustrious Class of ninety-eight has been 

\ organized but six short months, yet every one will admit 

^ the fact that we have already formed for ourselves a 

history worthy to be handed down to posterity through 

this noble book. 

Some one has said that the nation which has no history is the 
happiest, and although we wish to pay due respect to the sayings of 
great men, yet we have already proved that this saying, if true of 
nations, is not true of classes such as ours. 

October 20th, 1894, is one of the most important dates in the 
annals of Lasell ; for that was the day when the future Seniors, who, by 
the time they arrive at that dignity, will have electrified the world by 
their wonderful deeds, first began to exist as an organized body. Our 
officers are remarkable for their ability and efficiency, and especially has 
our president borne her honors well, notwithstanding the prominence into 
which her position has often brought her. 

It would be hard to state in what branch of study we most excel, 
for in all recitations we carry off the palm from our big sisters ; nor 
are we less noted for our deportment, which even the sternest of our 
teachers concedes to be ideally correct. Certainly, however, the study in 
which we take most interest is English. Our youthful m.inds are stirred 

(28) 



with enthusiasm by the forty minutes spent in Number Four twice a 
week. 

In mathematics we have made progress so wonderfully that our 
teacher has often felt wholly unable to keep pace with our growing 
minds, and on one occasion offered to resign her position in favor of 
two of our members. Indeed, all of the teachers feel inclined to follow 
this good example ; for instance, in etiquette and rules of good taste in 
dress, our president is generally acknowledged superior to the preceptress, 
although in several minor instances we have been obliged to recognize 
long-established rules, and even our brave leader was once forced to 
surrender part of her wardrobe to Mrs. Strong's closet, for safe-keeping. 

We are told by our elders that " our school days are the happiest 
in our lives." Can it be that our kind advisers ever were confronted 
by such obstacles as present themselves to us? We, perhaps, shall be 
able to surmount these; but that any others should be able to do so 
almost impossible a thing — preposterous! 




(29) 



'qy ^'Tke grirscj^ra cea^e (D^(^3^vi'Se i\\Q,y are feW." 



^opI)O0)ore Cla^s. 



Motto: "They can because they think they caji^ 



Class Color : Red and White. Class Flower : Red Carnation. 



Edith Blair 


President. 




Names. 


Residences. 


Rooms. 


Edith Blair, Lasellia . 


Wyoming, 0. . 


lO 


Emeline Carlisle 


Passaic, N.J. . 


Annex 5 


Gertrude A. Clarke, S.D. . 


Northampton, Mass. 


. 63 


Winifred T. Coniin, Lasellia 


New York, N.Y. . 


4 


Lena Evans, S.D. 


Fort Worth, Texas 


59 


Emma Ferris .... 


Swanton, Vt. . 


49 


Emma Grant, S.D. 


Summit, N.J. . 


43 


Edith Howe .... 


Passaic, N.J. . 


Annex 5 


Jess Hutchinson, S.D. 


Chicago, 111. . 


42 


Isabella Hyde .... 


Newtonville, Mass. . 


• 


Gertrude A. Jones, Lasellia 


Kansas City, Mo. . 


47 


Ida M. Kessinger, Lasellia 


Rome, N.Y. . 


34 


Anna P. Warner, S.D. 


Washington, D.C. . 


31 


Grace 'Washburn, Lasellia . 


Melrose, Mass. 


22 


Anna G. Whitman, Lasellia 


Wollaston Heights, Mass. 
(33) 


6 



Cla^s Mi^tofY, '5)7. 




S the historian of the Class of Ninety-seven stated, when we 
were but Freshmen, "we are unassuming, and prefer that 
our virtues be heralded by others than ourselves." 

We have lost none of this modesty during our 
two years al Lasell, but naturally, as Sophomores, we have discovered a 
few things of which we were not fully conscious in our innocent Fresh- 
men days. One of them is not to let false modesty interfere when praise 
is due, and, acting upon this truth, we wish to call the attention of the 
reader to some of the accomplishments of our members. 

It is hard to say in which study we excel, but we are confident 
that if Miss Carpenter were questioned as to which was the brightest 
class in history, she would immediately reply, " The Sophomore Class." 
The brilliant arguments which are advanced for or against England or 
France would certainly have been at least gravely considered by these 
governments could they have had them presented to them, while in 
German and English we gladden the hearts of our respective teachers 
by our prompt, if not always minutely exact recitations, not to mention 
" Trig," in which some of the class have " peculiar " talent. 

While preparatories we did not organize as a class, but at the 
beginning of last year we met in regular order and elected our president, 
who has continued to hold the office up to the present time. Several 

(34) 



exciting meetings were held last year to decide upon the flower and 
motto. One in particular, at which some of our honored friends, the 
Juniors, considered it their duty to laugh, was conducted with much 
ceremony on the library table. In spite of their ridicule we still hold 
the opinion that the library — even if it is on the table — is a much more 
dignified meeting-place than the floor of the "gym," where, not long ago, 
our little sisters, the Freshmen, had a grave debate one evening after 
chapel. 

The Class of Ninety-seven has never been a large one, but it can 
truthfull}- be said that the old proverb, "The choicest goods are often 
found in the smallest parcels," is very well illustrated by us. We num- 
bered only nine last year, and while four of these did not return this 
year, we have added eight new members. Let us trust that during the 
next two years many more will recognize our merits and wish to join 
us, so that when Mr. Bragdon presents us with that much-coveted parch- 
ment, there may be a large company to acknowledge the congratulations 
which will surely be offered to the Class of Ninety-seven. 






(35) 



'^6 ^'TKe cl)^oice^t cohrvJDaKy of daviKtle^^ ,5|Diri-t^ 
-tKat Were eV^r afloat oK tKe ^-tr^alrv of li-fe." 



////// / •■ 

'/////^ / ' 








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Junior Cto55. 



Motto: "Deeds, not words.'" 
Class Color : Green and Gold. Class Flower : La France Rose. 

Honorary Member. 



4^. 




^n^ 






■■^=^ 




Blanche L. Kelley . 





President. 




Cara a. Sawtn . 


. 


Secretary. 




Kate S. Pennell 


, 


Treasurer. 




Names. 


Residences. 




Rooms. 


F:!la F. Ampt, S.D. . 


Wyoming, 0. . 






53 


Martha AYery .... 


Plymouth, Mass. 






35 


Bessie Bailey .... 


Marion, Ind. . 






. Annex 


Isabel E. P>ronson, S.D. 


Ottawa, Ont. . 






9 


Nellie A. Carnahan, Lasellia 


Indianapolis, Ind. 






66 


Josephine B. Chandler, Lasellia . 


Maiden, Mass. 






8 


Alice W. Clarke 


Uxbridge, Mass. 






44 


Mary B. Cruikshank, S.D. . 


Denver, Col. . 






33 


Annie F. Gushing, Lasellia 


Foxcroft, Me. 






65 


Virginia S. Ellison, Lasellia 


Independence, Mo. 




47 


Grace P. Englehart . 


St. Joseph, Mo. 






22 


Jane Fitch . . . . . 


Mooers, N.Y, 






37 


Harriette Fitch 


Mooers, N.Y. 






37 


Rena French, Lasellia 


Chapin, 111. . 






56 


Celia E. Googins, S.D. 


Chicago, 111. . 

(39) 






42 



JUNIOR Cl.MS>?>.— Contimied. 



Names. 


Residences. 








Rooms. 


Annie J. Hackett 


Dubuque, la. . 








. 48 


Julia E. Hammond, S.D. . 


Chicago, 111. . 








31 


Bessie Hayward 


Temple, N.H. 








76 


Susie B. Hayward 


Uxbridge, Mass. 








44 


Lestra M. Hibberd, S.D. . 


Richmond, Ind. 








39 


Helen M. Holman, S.D. . 


Chicago, 111. . 








52 


Louise P. Hubbard, S.D. , 


Wheeling, W. Va. 








27 


Margaret Johnson 


Wellesley, Mass. 










Marion Josselyn, Lasellia . 


Manchester, N.H. 








28 


Blanche L. Kelley, S.D. . 


Worcester, Mass. . 








25 


Ethel Loud, Lasellia . . . , 


Everett, Mass. 








30 


Kate S. Pennell, S.D. 


Atchison, Kan. 








7 


Florence A. Ray, S.D. 


Ottawa, Ont. . 








9 


Cara A. Savvin, Lasellia 


Troy, N.Y. . 








4 


Margie M. Schuberth, S.D. 


Wyoming, 0. 








53 


Julia Tulleys, Lasellia 


Council Bluffs, la. . 








62 


Edith V. Watkins, S.D. . 


Detroit, Mich. 








Annex 


Ella W. Wilson, Lasellia . 


New York City 








38 



f 



C40) 



History of '^6. 



CHAPTER I. 

1. Now it came to pass in the 
forty-ninth year of the history of 
the Lasellianites, when many were 
scattered near and far, that Lasellins, 
their ^king, sent forth his decree; 
and thus smmmoned from the cities 
and towns a band of maidens, ^ fair 
to look upon, and of a good mind. 

2. Fifteen maidens came with joy 
and gladness to be numbered among 
the Lasellianites, and to be taught at 
their ^ court. 

3. And it came to pass in the 
ninth month of that year, when the 
maidens came before Lasellius, that 
he was made glad by their coun- 
tenances. He spake unto them, 
saying : 

4. Behold ye have come among 
a new people ; fear them not ; * be 
strong and of a good courage, also 
be ye obedient to the ^ disciples, 
and diligent in the work which they 
shall give unto you. And he gave 
them the name of ''Preps. 

5. During the first year of their 
sojourn at the court of the Lasellian- 
ites, many strange things came to 



iSee first 
name on page S 
of catalogue. 

2 And such 
were those who 
came. 

3 See the beau- 
tiful pictures in 
catalogue. 

J All this they 
proved to be. 

■J Somet i m e s 
called teachei's. 

'•Which means 
great expecta- 
tions. 

'With the 
pestilence com- 
mon to all 
Preps. 

8 Ask Miss R. 



pass. Their ^ struggles and victories 
will long be held in remembrance. 

6. Now it happened in the sixth 
month of the following year that all 
of the Lasellianites left the court, 
and were scattered into all parts of 
the land. 

7. But when the harvest time 
was nigh, and the decree was again 
sent forth, many returned, bringing 
strange maidens with them. 

8. And behold some were miss- 
ing ; for they had fallen by the way, 
or had gone to another court. 

9. It was the nineteenth year of 
the reign of Lasellius, and the second 
year of the Preps. The disciples 
were greatly pleased with the ninet)^- 
sixites ; and thus it came to pass 
that they were called Freshmen. 

10. Their lives as such were quiet 
and peaceful. They followed the 
teachings of the disciples with much 
diligence, and increased mightily in 
wisdom and ^ stature. 

11. In due time the Freshmen 
were summoned together. They 
came with fear and trembling ; for 
it had been made known unto them 



(41) 



that the disciples desired to put 
to ^ test their knowledge, skill, and 
strength. 

12. The students had been faith- 
ful, and were found wanting in noth- 
ing. Thereupon Lasellius called 
them blessed among the Lasellian- 
ites, and gave them the name of 
Sophomores. 

13. The combat with the monster 
^''Trig was long and difficult; but 
nothing could prevail against the 
power of these maidens. 

14. Also, on account of their vic- 
tory over the inhabitants of the 
stronghold ^^ Fizicks, they greatly 
astonished the ^^ disciple who dwelt 
in the land of Science. And their 
fame was spread abroad among all 
of the Lasellianites. 

CHAPTER II. 

1. Give ear, all ye people, and 
hear what has come to pass : 

2. Behold, in the twentieth year 
of Lasellius, many maidens joined 
themselves to this band ; and they 
were called Juniors. Now, these 
numbered one score and thirteen. 

3. It came to pass in this year 
that many Juniors, who before had 
been trained in the " army of the 
Lasellianites, showed much skill in 
the handling of " weapons. 

4. And the commander saith unto 
them : Ye have done well ; therefore 



^Tests, no 
exams., at La- 
sell. 

10 With which 
every Sopho- 
more at this 
court must 
struggle. 

" It was only 
with much 
digging that 
they broke 
down the barri- 
ers and entered 
the fortress. 

1- Who was ex- 
ceedingly rich 
in the resources 
of that land. 

13 Which af- 
forded great 
protection to 
the court. 

l^Not very 
dangerous ones. 

i^Some may 
doubt this. 

"■For many 
showed m u c h 
talent as ac- 
tresses. 

1 ' A s k the 
Class of '95 
what they are. 



will I make some officers, one even 
captain. And according to his word 
so was it done unto them. 

5. Others lifted up their voices 
and sang, some played ^^ skilfully 
and with a loud noise upon the 
cornet, harp, psaltery, and other 
instruments of musick. 

6. Moreover, it was the twenty- 
first year of Lasellius' reign, and 
the second month of the year, and 
the night of the fourth day of the 
month. 

7. Much people from the neigh- 
boring country was gathered to- 
gether at the court of the Lasellian- 
ites ; for the Juniors had summoned 
them thither with a promise to 
entertain them : and the Juniors 
spake no lies. 

8. The promise was fulfilled, and 
all of the people rejoiced greatly. 
Thus the ^^ fame of these maidens 
was again spread abroad. 

9. Thus far have the Juniors run 
well. And if they endure unto the 
end of this year, having stood the 
tests of the disciples, aird having 
conquered everything that stands in 
their way, they shall receive as their 
reward the name and " privileges of 
Seniors. Have mercy, and give 
them time, O Lasellius ! and all ye 
disciples ! and the Juniors will fulfil 
the expectation of your desires. 

Scribe. 



(42) 



'G,5 "HoW K2Sk)3)3>' tkey air^ ihy all ^eehrxlK^; 

HoW tliey |3oW, koW t[\cy bc'^^i^ K*^^ "^K^y flvit-t^r, 
HoW tk^y look at cack otkeir ar\cl ^mlle!" 



Senior Clci55. 



Motto: " Palma non sine labore est." 
Class Colors : Purple and Gold. Class Flowers : Violet and Marechal Niel Rose. 

Honorary Member. 
RICHARD HARDING DAVIS. 



Mabel C. Taylor 


President. 






Alice Andreesen 


Secretary. 


Helen B. Morris 


Treasurer. 


Names. 


Residences. Rooms. 


Alice Andreesen, S.D. 


Omaha, Neb. . . . . 67 


Grace L. Allen, S.D. 


Omaha, Neb. 






24 


Sara A. Bond, S.D. . 


Boston, Mass. 






6 


K. Belle Bragdon, S.D. 


Auburndale, Mass. . 








Gertrude Bucknum, S.D. . 


Denver, Col. . 






28 


Bertha Butterfield, Lasellia 


Waterville, Me. 






74 


Eleanor R. Clapp, S.D. 


E. Weymouth, Mass. 






29 


Anne May Dickson . 


Martinsville, Ind. . 






13 


Frances V. Fairchild, S.D. . 


Marinette, Wis. 






40 


Hattie Freebey .... 


Los Angeles, Cal. . 






73 


Sara Hayden, Lasellia 


E; Hartford, Conn. 






65 


Grace E. Loud, Lasellia 


Everett, Mass. 






30 


Mabel M. Lutes . . . . 


Indianapolis, Ind. . 






5 


Dorothy M. Manning, S.D. 


Dayton, 0. 






25 


Helen B. Morris, Lasellia . 


Boston, Mass. 






I 


Julia Murphy .... 


Portsmouth, 0. 






13 


Annie E. Richards, S.D. . 


Weymouth, Mass. . 






27 


Mabel W. Sawyer, Lasellia 


Dexter, Me. . 






5 


Caroline L. Steel, S.D. 


Portland, Ore. 






58 


EHzabeth Stephenson, S.D. 


Marinette, Wis. 






40 


Mabel C. Taylor, S.D. 


Omaha, Neb. 




24 




(45) 









A History in Adjectives. 



l^tJy^A JC^^y^ HEN called upon to write the customary Senior history 
'tm/rVin ^^^ ^'^^ far-famed Allerlei, our thoughts naturally first 
)l?"(JCSi wandered to productions of former years, to compare 
C^^ ■ - • J them, favorably or otherwise, with our proposed 
chronicles. In all these interesting recitals of past 
glory, we find descriptions of genius, valor, and beauty, but all are 
invariably couched in the same language, the same form. Although 
Solomon has indeed said (and who would dare dispute him?) that there 
is nothing new under the sun, this gentleman did not live when the 
great and glorious Class of '95 wrote its history. He did not have an 
Allerlei to read; therefore how could he help blundering on some points? 
Whether the Juniors' production equals the sun, is not for us to judge, 
but in these two pages we give you something which is entirely new to 
this, and to like volumes. Instead of enumerating bare facts illustrative 
of our surpassing deeds in the last six months, we place before you a 
list of our members and their virtues, feeling sure that you will thereby 
more readily see our own wonderful worth as a class. 

" Eacli a part of one stupendous zvhole." 

(46) 



Alice Andrersen 
Grace L. Allen . 
Sara A. Bond 
K. Belle Bragdon 
Gertrude Bucknum 
Bertha Butterfield 
Eleanor R. Clapp 
Anne May Dickson 
Frances V. Fairchild 
Hattie Freebey . 
Sara Hayden 
Grace E. Loud . 
Mabel M. Lutes 
Dorothy M. Manning 
Helen B. Morris 
Julia Murphy 
Annie E. Richards 
Mabel W. Sawyer 
Caroline L. Steel 
Elizabeth Stephenson 
Mabel C. Taylor 



Perfectly faultless. 

Sweet-tempered. 

Sharp. 

Efficient. 

Dreamy. 

Kind-hearted. 

Smiling. 

Faithful. 

Reasoning. 

Brilliant 

Witty. 

Temperate 

Careful. 

Fascinating. 

Poetical. 

Plucky. 

Persevering. 

Charitable. 

True. 

Gentle and Mild. 

Stately. 




(47) 



Irregalar^;. 



Names. 






Residences. 






Rooms. 


Julia Aldrich, S.D. .... St. Louis, Mo. .... 60 


Anna Baeclitel . 






Hagerstown, Md. . 




Cottage 


Alice H. Ball, Lasellia 






Grand Rapids, Mich. 




54 


Maud M. Barker, S.D. 






Bay City, Mich. 






10 


Marie L. Barnes 






Dover, N.H. . 






70 


Irene L. Battey 






Attleboro', Mass. . 






14 


Eugenia M. Beetle 






New Bedford, Mass. 






■ 56 


Grace P. Bliss, S.D. . 






Atchison, Kan. 






7 


Nellie M. Briggs, Lasellia 






Boston, Mass. 






15 


Nan S. Brown . 






New York City 






Annex 


Margaret Bullock 






Chicago ... 






Cottage 


Josephine Burket 






Portland, Me. 








Norine Burroughs, Lasellia 






Edwardsville, 111. . 








Clara S. Cameron, Lasellia 






Fall River, Mass. . 






56 


Helen W. Chadbourne 






Lowell, Mass. 






Annex 


Flora E. Clark . 






Worcester, Mass. . 






Annex 


Gertrude Clark, S.D. . 






Northampton, Mass. 






63 


Ruth Cleveland, S.D. 






Denver, Col. . 






Annex 


Margaret B. Cobb, Lasellia 






Kalamazoo, Mich. . 






48 


Esther M. Davis 






Oneida, N.Y. . 






20 


Anna Deane 






Fall River, Mass. . 






51 


Mary L. Dunlap 






Columbus, 0. 






35 


Nettie Eldredge, Lasellia . 






Portsmouth, N.H. . 








Sadie Eldredge, Lasellia 






Portsmouth, N.H. . 






29 


Mabel Gibson . 






SaleiTi, N.Y. . 






56 


Isabel Ginn 






Belfast, Me. . 






52 


Emma Goll, S.D. 






Chicago, 111. . 






39 


Grace L. Harrison 






Minneapolis, Minn. 








Adena E. Harvey 






Saratoga Springs, N.Y. . 
(48) 






8 



IRREGULARS. — Continued. 



Names. 

Clarissa Hastings 

Olive Healey, S.D. 

Clara Heath, S.D. 

Louese C. Horton, Lasellia 

Julia Inglee 

Gertrude Jones, Lasellia 

Ruth Kimball 

Lucilla B. Knapp 

Rose Lathrop 

Bessie Latimer 

Clara Lewis, Lasellia . 

Martha P. List, S.D. . 

Fannie Lord 

Agnes S. Lowe . 

Edna M. Makepeace, Lasellia 

May Muth 

H. Ernestine Orton, Lasellia 

Lucille Parish 

Caroline Patton . 

Ettiemay Pierson, Lasellia 

Bessie T. Roper 

Mary C. Rue 

Eleanor E. Rumsey . 

Ellen D. Sanborn, S.D. 

L. M. Sawyer 

Elise E. Scott . 

Elizabeth S. Shaw, S.D. 

Julia L. Shearer 

Florence Slate, S.D. . 

Beulah L. Smith 

Gertrude Smith . 

Florence L. Stedman 

Blanche M. Swope, S.D. 

George L Swope, S.D. 

Anna Walston, S.D. . 

Cora M. Watson 

Lillian Wetherell 

Nellie S. Wilson 



Residences. 

Holyoke, Mass. 
New York City 
Denver, Col. . 
Cleveland, O. 
Machias, Me. . 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Clarinda, la. . 
Auburndale, Mass. 
Auburndale, Mass. 
Auburndale, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Hancock, N.Y. 
Chicago, 111. . 
Attleboro', Mass. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Rome, N.Y. . 
Chicago, 111. . 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Minneapolis, Minn 
Hopedale, Mass. 
Coshocton, O. 
Wolcott, N.Y. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Auburndale, Mass. 

Newburyport, Mass. 
Carabridgeport, Mass. 
Williamsport, Penn. 
Rondout, N.Y. 
London, O. 
Needham, Mass. 
Washington, D.C. 
Washington, D.C. 
Decatur, 111. . 
Spencer, Mass. 
Exeter, N.H. . 
Nahant, Mass. 



Kooms. 

Annex 

55 
i6 

Annex 

II 

47 
19 



Annex 

64 

Cottage 

49 

7 

41 

Annex 

Annex 

60 

64 

^Z 
Annex 

20 

60 



Annex 

Annex 
18 
70 

Annex 
Annex 

57 
70 
70 
26 



(49) 



Ifn flDemonam. 



JOSEPHINE BAKER, 

Died, August, 18Q4. 



MRS. ANNA R. LATIMER, 

Died, July, i8q4. 



MRS. MARY SHELLENBERGER HERKNESS, 
Died, December, iSq^.. 



(50) 




JJr'€^^<:P.'hMf^ '. 



3- D. 3oCiet^. 



President. 
ELIZABETH STEPHENSON. 



Vice-Presiden t. 
GERTRUDE BUCKNUM. 



Secretary. 
KAl^E S. PENNELL. 



Treasurer. 
ELLA F. AMPT. 



Ushers. 
RUTH CLEAVELAND, FLORENCE SLATE. 



BLANCHE SWOPE, 



Executive Cotni?tittee. 



GEORGE SWOPE. 



JULIA ALDRICH, 



Critic. 
LENA EVANS. 



Honorary Members. 



Martha E. Ransom, 

Florence Wells, 

Adeline Allen, 



J. Walter Davis, 

Isabel Shinn, 

Louise Putnam. 



(51) 



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MEMBERS OF S. D. SOCIETY. 



Julia Aldrich, 

Grace L. Allen, 

Ella F. Ampt, 

Alice Andreesen, 
Lulu Appel, 

Maud Barker, 
Grace Bliss, 

Sara A. Bond, 

K. Belle Bragdon, 
Isabel E. Bronson, 

Gertrude Bucknura, 
Ada Cadmus, 
Gertrude Clarke, 

Eleanor R. Clapp, 

Ruth Cleaveland, 

Mary B. Cruikshank, 
Harriet Dalzell, 

Lena Evans, 
Frances V. Fairchild, 
Celia Googins, 

Emma H. Goll, 

Emma Grant, 

Julia E. Hammond, 
Helen Holman, 



Olive Healey, 

Clara Heath, 

Louise P. Hubbard, 

Jess Hutchinson, 

Blanche L. Kelley, 
Martha P. List, 
Dorothy M. Manning, 
Caroline Patton, 

Kate S. Pennell, 

Florence A. Ray, 

Annie E. Richards, 
Ellen Sanborn, 
Florence Slate, 

Caroline L. Steele, 

Elizabeth Stephenson, 
Mabel M. Lutes, 

Blanche Swope, 

George Swope, 
Margie Schuberth, 

Mabel C. Taylor, 

Anna Walston, 

Anna P. Warner, 

Edith Watkins. 



(53) 



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IvQS^tlia Ctob. 



President. 
CARA SAWIN. 

Vice-Presiden t. 
LAURA CHAPMAN. 

Secretary. Treasurer. 

NORINE BURROUGHS. CLARA LEWIS. 

Critic. 
ETHEL LOUD. 

Guards. 
MAUD MAYO, CLARA CAMERON, • MARIE GRISWOLD. 

Executive Committee. 
JOSEPHINE CHANDLER, IDA KESSINGER, ALICE BALL. 



Honorary Members. 

Herbert Lowell Rich, Elizabeth McMartin, 

Willis E. Nowell, Henry Orne Ryder, 

Joseph A. Hills, Mary Patton Witherbee. 

(55) 



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MEMBERS OF LASELLIA CLUB. 



Alice Ball, 

Edith Blair, 

Edith Bucklin, 

Norine Burroughs, 
Bertha Butterfield, 
Clara Cameron, 

Josephine Chandler, 
Laura Chapman, 

Kittiebel Chapman, 
Margaret Cobb, 
Winifred Conlin, 
Annie Cushing, 

Nellie Carnahan, 
Sadie Eldredge, 
Virginia Ellison, 
Blanche Ford, 
Rena French, 

Margaret Gere, 
Marie Griswold, 
Sara Hayden, 

Louese Hofton, 
Gertrude Jones, 



Marion Josselyn, 
Ida Kessinger, 

Alice Kimball, 
Clara Lewis, 
Grace Loud, 
Ethel Loud, 

Maude Mayo, 
Susie Montgomery, 
Helen Morris, 

Ernestine Orton, 
Ettiemay Pierson, 
Cara Sawin, 

Mabel Sawyer, 

Ellen Seidentopf, 
Julia TuUeys, 

Emily Warner, 

Grace Washburn, 
Lillian Wetherell, 
Ella Wilson, 

Marie Wilson, 

Anna Whitman. 



(57) 



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Orpf)ean Cltib. 



Grace Allen, Emeline Carlisle, Clara Lewis, 

Alice Andreesen, Flora Clarke, Grace Loud, 

Lulu Appel, Ruth Cleaveland, Mabel Lutes, 

Clarissa Arnold, Winifred Conlin, Ernestine Orton, 



Martha Baker, 
Maud Barker, 
Irene Battey, 
Claire Beebe, 
Belle Bragdon, 

Gertrude Bucknum, 
Norrine Burroughs, 
Clara Cameron, 



Nettie Eldridge, Ettiemay Pierson, 

Francis Fairchild, Florence Ray, 

Sadie Farnsworth, Mabel Sawyer, 

Margaret Gere, Mabel Taylor, 

Isabel Ginn, Edith Walkins, 

Julia Hammond, Anna Warner, 

Blanche Kelley, Nellie Wilson, 



Ida Kessinger, 



Marie Wilson, 
Ella Wilson. 



J. Walter Davis, Conductor 

Lestra M. Hibbard, Accompanist. 

(59) 



Piano -forte ©aartet^. 



II. 



HNNE GUSHING, 



ALICE flNDREESEN, 



SRRR HflYDEN, 



LOUESE HORTON, 



MflRTHH JIYERY, 



iVLRBEL SAWYER, 



LESTRfl HIBBERD, 



MflRTHfl HYERY, 



III. 



11/. 



JflNE FITCH, 



FLORENCE RflY, 



SHRfl BOND, 



ANNA WHITMAN, 



EDITH BUCKLIN, 



CLHRfl CAMERON, 



ELLA WILSON. 



MARY CRUIKSHfiNK, 



(60) 



"Las^tt Leaves." 



"Dux Femiua Faciiy 



Published monthly, during the School Year, by Lasell Publishing Association. 



FIRST TERM. 

Gertrude Bucknum, '95, President. 

Anna Gushing, '96, Vice-President. 

Gara Sawin, '96, Secretary. 

Editor-in- Chief. 
Annie Richards, '95. 

Associate Editors. 

Caroline Steel, '95. 

Marion Josselyn, '96. 

Mabel Sawyer, '95. 

Local Editor. 
Alice Andreesen, '95. 

Exchange Editor. 
Dorothy Manning, '95. 

Subscription Agent. 
Grace Loud, '95. 



SEGOND TERM. 

Ella Wilson, '96, President. 
Lulu Appel, '91, Vice-President. 
Blanche Kelley, '96, Secretary. 

Editor-in- Chief. 
Mabel Sawyer, '95. 

Associate Editors. 

Sara Hayden, '95. 

Nellie Garnahan, '96. 

Emily Warner, '98. 

Local Editor. 
Gara Sawin, '96. 

Exchange Editor. 
Marion Josselyn, '96. 

Subscription Agent. 
Isabel Bronson. 



THIRD TERM. 

Margaret Gere, '98, President. 
Ida Kessinger, '97, Vice-President. Anna Gushing, '96, Secretary. 

Editor-in- Chief. 
Nellie Garnahan, '96. 

Associate Editors. 
Virginia Ellison, '96. Lena Evans, '97. 



Local Editor. 
Mary Rue. 



Exchange Editor. 
Gertrude Jones. 

(61) 



Adena Harvey. 

Subscription Agent. 
Nellie Wilson. 



CI)riStian Association^. 



MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 



Mabel Sawyer . 
Grace Allen 
Bessie Roper 

Miss A. Allen . 

Mrs. Curtis 
Helen B. Morris 
Kate S. Pennell 
Ella W. Wilson 
Grace E. Loud 



President. 

Vice -Presiden t. 

Secretary. 
\ Treasurer and Correspond- 
l iiig Secretary. 



Executive Committee. 



CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR SOCIETY. 



Bessie Roper 
Ella W. Wilson 
Ethel Loud 
Emma Ferris 
Nellie Briggs . 
Annie F. Gushing 
Caroline L. Steele 
Bessie Hayward 
Grace E. Loud 
Alice W. Clark 
Eleanor Rumsey 
Anna L. Espy . 
Flora A. Clark \ 
Ruth K. Merriam S 
Frances V. Fairchild 
Ida M. Kessinger 
Grace L. Allen 
Julia Tulleys 
Esther M. Davis 



President. 
Vice-Preside7it. 
Secretary. 

Corresponding Secretary. 
Treasurer. 

Lookout Committee. 



Prayer- Meeting Committee. 

Missionary Committee. 
Temperance Committee. 

Music Committee. 
Social Committee. 



C62) 




Dre55 Catting. 



Martha Baker, 

Marie L. Barnes, 

Eugenia M. Beetle, 



Clara S. Cameron, 

Winifred T. Conlin, 
Helen M. Holman. 



I\i{{m^r%. 



Marie Barnes, 



Beulah Smith. 



(63) 




^^^%. 



CooJ^ing Clas^e^. 



Sl^II^D YEf\T{. 



GRKCE Iv. HLLEN, 

K. BElvIvE BRflGDON, 

BERTHII BUTTERFIEED, 
HflTTIE FREEBEY, 



BESSIE RRYWRRD, 
HEEEN B. iVLORRIS, 
BESSIE ROPER, 

CAROLINE L, STEEL, 
MABEL C. TAYLOR, 



SpE<?I/iCS. 



LULU M, fiPPEL, 
MARTHA BAKER, 

MARIE L. BARNES, 
MILDRED BELL, 

NETTIE ELDREDGE, 



EMMA H, GOLL, 
EMMA C, GRANT, 
AGNES S, LOWE, 

CAROLINE PATTON, 
ELIZABETH S. SHAW. 



(6s) 



3tadio. 



GERTRUDE BUCKNUiVL, 
HARRIET DflLZELL, 
BESSIE EflTIMER, 

iVLflRTHfl P, LIST, 
GRUCE LOUD, 

iVLflUD iVLHYO, 

KRY iVLUTH, 

EUCILEE PHRISH, 

GERTRUDE SMITH, 
MHBEE THYEOR, 
EEEH WIESON, 



(66) 



La^ell Battalion. 



OFFICERS. 

Acting Major . . Captain Florence A. Ray. 

Acting Adjutant . . LIEUTENANT GERTRUDE BUCKNUM. 

Acting Sergeant-Major . SERGEANT ALICE Andreesen. 

COMPANY A. 

Captain, FLORENCE A. Ray. 
Lieutenant, MABEL W. SAWYER. 

Sergeants. Corporals. 

First, Annie E. Richards, Clara Heath, 

Second, Emma H. Goll, Louese C. Horton, 

Third, MARY B. Cruikshank. Gertrude Jones. 

COMPANY B. 

Captain, GRACE E. LouD. 
Lieutenant, WINIFRED T. CONLIN. 

Sergeants. Corporals. 

First, Josephine B. Chandler, Editpi V. Watkins, 

Second, Ka'ie S. Pennell, Margaret S. Gere, 

Third, Nellie M. Briggs. Lulu M. Appel. 

COMPANY C. 

Captain, GRACE L. Allen. 
Lieutenant, GERTRUDE BuCKNUM. 

Sergeants. Corporals. 

First, Julia E. Hammond, Rena M. French, 

Second, JULIA Tulleys, Elsa Doepke, 

Third, Emily C. Warner. Alice W. Clarke. 

(67) 



3vin)iner<^. 



Julia Aldrich, Annie Hackett, 

Bessie Bailey, Clarissa Hastings, 

Martha Baker, Clara Heath, 

Maude Barker, Louese Horton, 

Eugenia Beetle, Julia Inglee, 

Frances Bowman, Ida Kessinger, 

Nellie Briggs, Ruth Kimball, 

Edith Bucklin, • Susan Montgomery, 

Ada Cadmus, May Muth, 

Clara Cameron, Lucile Parish, 

Annie Cushing, Ellen Sanborn, 

Esther Davis, Margie Schuberth, 

Sadie Eldredge, Florence Slate, 

Lena Evans, Beulah Smith, 

Frances Fairchild, Gertrude Smith, 

Blanche Ford, Blanche Swope, 

Margaret Gere, George Swope, 

Marie Griswold, Lillian Wetherell. 



(68) 






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LaselUa Ctob P^anc^aet. 



JUNE 7, 1894. 



TOj^sys 



President's Address Miss SIEBERLING. 

Toast-mistress Miss SAWIN. 

The Senior Class Miss MEDSKER. 

The S. D. Society Miss HOGG. 

The Ladies .^ . . Mr. NOWELL. 

The Lasellia Club Miss MacMARTIN. 

'94 Miss WARNOCK. 



'•- 



3. D. P>anq,^^^- 



JUNE 8, 1894. 



President's Address Miss McECHRON. 

Response Miss MEFJSKER. 

Lasellia Club Miss SHERMAN. 

The Faculty Miss ALLEN. 

The Sterner Sex Miss STEEL. 

Toast-mistress, Miss TAYLOR. 
(70) 



Oqss Nigl)t. 

JUNE II, 1894. 



Class Song. 

President's Address HELEN BOULT MEDSKER. 

Introduction GRACE ROBB. 

Class History VIRGINIA WYCOFF. 

Society Notes JULIA WEST ANDERSON. 

Piano Solo LOTTA J. PROCTER. 

Revised Catalogue JENNIE RICH. 

Recitation, " Dorothy Q." . . DASIE ASENATH HARTSON. 

(Oliver Wendell Holmes.) 

Forget Us Not CAROLYN OILMAN. 

GLEE CLUB. 
Mary Tulleys, Mildred Warren, 

Julia Ellen Hogg, Harriet G. Scott, 

Carrie Manning, Greta Stearns, 

Carrie Johnson, Elizabeth Murray Warnock. 

Reminiscences L. MABEL CASE. 

Prophecy ALICE NOBLE. 

Good-By GERTRUDE SHERMAN. 

0U1~-D00R EXERCISES. 

Presentation BESSIE SHEPHERD. 

Burying of Relics .... MOLLIE ST. JOHN TAYLOR. 

(71) 



jQiiior I^nfertaimnent. 

FEBRUARY 4, 1895. 



f\ COl/E OF fl BOKKET- 

A Play in One Act. 

CHARACTERS: 

Mrs. Clipper, a widow Miss Hammond. 

Kitty, her daughter Miss Ray. 

Aunt Jemima Hopkins, a leetle inquisitive . . . Miss Ellison. 
Mrs. Hortensia Fastone, very genteel .... Miss Watkins. 

Dora, her daughter Miss Sawin. 

Katy Doolan, Irish Servant Miss Josselyn. 

Orchestra — Selected. 



A Play in One Act. 

CHARACTERS: 

Mrs. Bryan, devoted to young people . . . Miss Schuberth 
Angelique, her maid, whose English is some- 
what Frenchy 

Phyllis Herndon, always in a scrape . . . 
Jean Drexel, r Society girls, with a taste | 

Marjorie Vandessen, ( for private theatricals ) 
Aunt Nancy Butternut, from Auburndale . 

Orchestra — Selected. 

(72) 



. Miss Sawin. 
Miss Pennell. 
. Miss Wilson. 
. Miss Kelley. 
Miss Hubbard. 




Ifit-epoF^ 



Wf)^ I Came to Oa^eK. 




T the request of the Faculty, the Board of Editors has taken 

the trouble to ascertain what induced certain girls to come 
to Lasell. 

The following answers have been dropped into the box : 

E. Clapp, — To study chemistry. 

S. Bond. — To do missionary work. 

E. Loud. — To learn to dance. 

C. Steel. — To room with Nan. 

B. Kelley. — To aid the Faculty in reforming the Sem. 

L. Hubbard. — To learn to sing. 

I. Bronson. — To get variety in food. 

D. Manning. — To spoon with — any one. 

M. Barker. — To write her daily letter in peace. 

H. Morris. — There is no apparent excuse. 

M. Avery. — To cultivate my conversational powers. 

A. Kimball. — To be a foot-ball for the "Strong." 

H. DalzeLL. — To get thin. 

A. Whitman. — To be near Harvard. 

J. Hammond. — To be near Cousin Delia. 

E. Watkins. — To be Billy's next. 

(74) 



A Coin Conference. 




N recitation-room No. i, resting peacefully in a square box, was 
a heap of shining coin. 

Only a moment before the room had been crowded with 
noisy, excited girls, who had rapidly dispersed at the ringing of a 
bell, leaving a silence doublv impressive by comparison with the 
previous tumult. 

Presently an odd thing happened. A close observer would have thought at 
first that an electric shock had passed through the bottom of the box, then he would 
have been too amazed to think at all, for presto, change ! the box was empty, and 
all over the surface of the table were seated what a moment before was apparently 
a pile of coins, but now was seen to be a crowd of tiny creatures with funny little 
arms and legs, queer round heads, and bright shining faces, whose eyes, mouths, and 
noses looked wondrously like figures and letters. 

They were seated in regular rows before a high desk of fairy dimensions, 
behind which sat a sober-looking personage with an amusing assumption of dignity, 
and with a look too genuinely nice to belong to any mortal. 

The assembly looked very much like a miniature court, and appeared even 
more so when one of the creatures, who sat below the judge's desk, rose gravely 
and spoke in thin, shrill tones : 



" Your Honor, this is an important case. 
On which our wisdom shall with justice 
dwell ; 

We'll now consider those of human race. 
The Faculty versus The Girls o' Lasell." 



(Wisdom's Plea for the Faculty.) 
"A thing most wonderful, would mortals 

say. 
And this would e'en the nice, full 

soon confess. 



(75) 



How coins should talk in this very strange 
way 
Is a puzzle beyond their pow'r to 
guess. 

" With great surprise would these same 
mortals know 
That all those many things which they 
call 'queer,' 
We spirit-folk full easily could show, 
If this these grosser ones could see 
and hear. 

" We are to them of most important use ; 

But they will grant us neither thought 
nor sense, 
Subjecting us to all kinds of abuse, 

For we are but their common ' pence.' 

" Just why we should be gathered thus 
to-day. 
Perhaps it is not needful I should 
state ; 
We are the fines the lazy girls must pay 
Whene'er to breakfast they descend 
too late. 

"Now, to my mind this fine seems just 
and right. 
Because the careless one who breaks a 
rule 



Should surely pay some penalty — not 
light — 
For thus reflecting shame upon the 
school. 

" Again, to uphold indolence is wrong ; 
So think all those who wish to help 
the youth 
To build a character both firm and 
strong, 
On principles of honor, right, and 
. truth. 

" I lastly urge that none who've gathered 
here, 
Could, if they wished, support a worthier 
aim 
Than this, to bear the tidings of good 
cheer, 
And spread abroad the knowledge of 
God's name. 

" Now, before Brother Justice has the 
floor, 
I humbly beg of you this further 
grace, 
Ihat I by you may be allowed once 
more 
To plead the right o' th' Faculty in 
this case." 



Then did the little gentleman proceed most elaborately to show that in this 

matter all the justice was on the side of the Faculty, and none on the side of the 
girls. 

(76) 



(The Unanimous Testimony of the 

Witnesses.) 

" If kind fate has decreed that you 

should look 
Into my former owner's pocket-book, 
Few coins would you have found for 
distribution ; 
And if to breakfast she had not been 

late, 
Mine would have been a very different 
fate, 
To swell the Sunday morning's contri- 
bution." 

(Justice's Plea.) 

" First, gentlemen, I do desire to state, 
That if once to breakfast a girl is late. 
To call her lazy is most unrefined ; 
Besides, it is untrue, and most unkind. 
In my opinion there should be no rule 
To make a maiden dread the hours of 
school. 

" But that these rules seem needful, I 

confess ; 
Do not they lend to Discipline its dress? 
I would not, I protest, mete them abuse. 
But rather would lament their great mis- 
use. 
A fair example of which will be known 
When all the facts of this case I have 
shown. 



" In all good works we ever want a 
place, 

Provided we are given with wiUing grace ; 

But in the way which we have been col- 
lected, 

This aspect of the case has been neg- 
lected. 

While simply as a means of punish- 
ment, 

It holds a smaller place than it was 
meant. 

" So, to sum up the facts now for con- 
clusion, 

I hold it an injustice and intrusion 

Upon the rights of the girls and all our 
coin. 

Whose purpose they have thus dared to 
purloin ; 

For all the principles of Philosophy 
teach, 

That two things done at once are half- 
done each, 

So that we cannot serve both good and 
wrong, 

And still continue to the good to belong." 

(The Judge's Verdict.) 

" What each one has had to tell 
Has been said extremely well ; 
But duty plainly points the way. 
And wisdom yields to Justice's sway." 



Just here there was a mingling of many voices, and the loud tramp of feet 
outside the door. In a twinkHng the surface of the table was cleared, a silvery 
cloud rested for a moment over the box, and then every coin might have been seen 
calmly reposing in its former place. 

in) 




EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 





METHODIST CHURCH. 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. 



Sttnda^^ Table Tall^. 




ETHODIST GIRL. — " Girls, I never was so hungry in 
my life. There was a strange minister in church, and 
he preached an hour and a quarter, then gave out the 
hymn, 'Art thou weary?'" 

Chorus. — " How perfectly killing ! " 
Episcopal Girl. — "But, about sermons — Mr. M. forget his, and 
he had such hard work remembering the text and the points, that the 
grammar had to take care of itself; and it was something like Billy's 
grammar, when his thoughts flow too fast." 

Congregational Girl. — "Girls, we had the greatest excitement 
in the Congregational Church. Dr. C. made a gesture; the first bass 
was just going out till after the sermon, but he was so surprised he 
sank back into his seat." 

E. G. — " Mr. M. was even more dramatic than usual, and he 
seemed unable to forget the existence of his heart. Two of the cutest 
choir boys got into the procession coming back, and Mrs. Strong found 
it out and waited till they reached her, then she walked behind them 
the rest of the way." 

C. G. — "Did they sing any better to-day?" 

E. G. — "It was heart-rending to listen to them; they flat to per- 
fection; positively they get worse ever}' Sunday; but we had the grandest 

solo during the collection, that lovely Mr. ." 

(79) 



M. G. — "Talking about singing, I wish you could hear that man 
at the Methodist Church ; he drowns the choir and the congregation 
completely out. Oh, did you know Eleanor and Anne are in an awful 
mess? Mr. B. was making a specially enthusiastic prayer about missions, 
and they were tossing pennies ; they'd gathered up the collection from the 
girls around, — four cents, I think it was, — and they were just having a 
fine time, when Anne happened to look around, and there was Prof, 
watching them with anything but a devout expression ; he's sent for them 
to come to his office after dinner." 

Chorus. — "How mean!" 

E. G. — "Sara can equal that; she and Alice made dolls out of 
their handkerchiefs, with black pins for eyes, and danced them till the 
little choir boys nearly had hysterics ; and the leader came up here after 
service and asked Mrs. Strong if she couldn't manage to keep her girls 
in order." 

M. G. — "Wonder how she'll do it? She can't make them all sit 
next her." 

C. G. — " Chocolates ! How grand ! And Billy isn't here ! I wonder 
how many I can carry up — you walk on that side, Margie, so Miss 
Carpenter can't see — there, that was beautifully done. Come and see 
me in meditation hour, girls ; I didn't listen to the sermon, so I haven't 
anything to meditate about." 



(80) 



Iva^ell 3ong. 



Tune: ''The Old Oaken Bucket:' 

"^ ' OW dear to oxir l^earts is Lasell Senqiriary, 
X' f Tt[e n\ot]:\er of iis Vi^^io revere l^er loved riarqe ; 
How foqdly wa clirig to r\er sweet recollecttoi), 
firid loiig to do ailgl^t tt|at will Iqerald r\er farqe, 

How true sJ:|e is always to OT\e ii] afflictiori, 
Witl) Kind rrjiriistratiori sl|e strerigt]^er]s tt^at l^eart ; 

Hrid to tliose wl^o go fortl) ir(to life fiill of courage 
SYye gives Vrye \^ise coUrisel tYyej qeed for tlrieir art, 

Siricerest of frierids, sl:|e lias rie'er proved Urifaitlifal, 
But always is true to l\er c]:\ildreri so dear ; 

Let Us ever resourid wit]:\ a clr^orus of praises, 
Hrid frorq our good lives give l)er riotl\irig to fear. 



(8i) 



TI)e Janior^s. 




SPLENDOR falls on Lasell 
walls, 
Reflected thro' its pleasant 
halls ; 

The Juniors come with beat of drum, — 
The silly Freshmen all stand mum 
As this fair class, unknown to story, 
Brings gay and blithe its AUerlei, 
Made bright by jests of long-gone by; 
Made sad by whispers of farewell ; 
Made sweet as any silver bell 
By tales of all their Junior glory. 
Blow, trumpet, blow ! have these fair 

maids been lying? 
And answer echoes, answer : They've 
been lying, sighing, crying. 

Oh hark ! oh hear ! oh my ! oh dear ! 
There cometh one with calm eyes clear, 
And in her hand she holds a sheet 
Of paper filled with some "rich treat" 
For us who now would fain be going. 
"Now, do you think" — "Oh, yes; I'm 

sure " — 
" I see the title, — 'tis a lure 
For folk unwary who will stay 
To hear this maiden read to-day 
Her great immortal Junior poem. 
Blow, trumpet, blow ! ere this fair maid 

deceive us. 



Come, let us beg her leave us, leave us, 
leave us." 

(The maiden reads : ) 
The \amp /hat sheds its mellow golden ray 
O'er academic halls illumining 
The students' quiet uneventful life, — 
Be this my inspiration as I sing, — 
This lamp of wisdom light me as I sing 
Of "many things and one" this festive 
day. 

A very fitting theme- for poet mine; 
'Tis how this Junior Class is bound to 

shine. 
In Bible class they chiefly do excel ; 
And yet, methinks, I heard one say the 

while 
That Yitbroifs on the left bank of the 

Nile. 
But then, you know, such slips do oft 

occur. 

Of such sedate and sober minds are they 
Scarce can you lure them to the opera. 
Yet when they're told, "You must go," 

one will say, 
" Oh, W(f// is out of us to suffice so, 
I to this light and frivolous thing will go. 
If you will spare the rest of my dear class." 

2) 



Such sacrificing spirit do they show ! 
With their fair hands much wilhng work 

they do. 
Among their ranks a cliandler skilled have 

they ; 
Two sweet hay-war dew?,, for to rake the 

hay; 
In xn\x%\c-larks themselves do hide their 

head 
At sound of notes by Juniors uttered. 

When gay and gallant G.A.R.'s do come 
To strike these maids with admiration dumb, 
One \\hoI[t) man all her own each Jun- 
ior lass 
In cap and drill-suit claims. Alack ! alas ! 
For other girls who may not do so well, 
And in a note next day this they'll pen 
Nell. 

Within their rooms are cushings soft and gay, 
Sweet, cosey corners where to rest and play 
At study of some prosy, ponderous book. 
And this thing shall you find in every 

nook — 
Tom's, Dick's, and Harry's photographs, 

and all 
That makes it fitting their rooms " dens " 

to call. 

French is to them as is their mother- 
tongue. 
Loicd and yet louder let their praise be 

sung ! 
One fair girl hath such vigorous strength, 

they say. 
That should she happen on a cherry-tree. 
Or tree of any sort, with powerful blows 
She'll liackeit into bits beneath your nose. 

Hani, Monday noons, they lunch upon 
with joy ; 



Go josselyn through the halls without 

annoy. 
Such sweet content as they display, sure I 
Ne'er saw in maiden's face. I can't tell 

why. 
But happy are they from the rise of sun 
Till the sun's setting when the day is done. 

Since near great Boston town they dwell, 

say they, 
No singer will they have of common clay. 
But a Hub bard shall chant their rounde- 
lay. 
A perfect Trilby she, whose liquid notes 
The turtle-dove shall envy while she gloats. 
As is her wont, upon the fickle moon. 

When maiden No. One presents her 

" brother," 
" Wat kill's he to you?" roguish asks 

another. 
One is there gives them joy, — aye, great 

delight, 
Such as mama's is, when the bald-pate 

wight 
Upon her lap doth lisp in baby play. 
And " goo-d^x-goo " 'gins with a smile to 

say. 

0/ itcli for power or fame this class knows 

naught, 
With pure and high desire for wisdom 

fraught 
Their maiden minds are. From far 

Canada 
Hath shot a bright, a clear, a dazzling ray 
To make more radiant yet the Junior day. 
On an excursion bent, these Juniors once. 

With shepherd's critik, shank's mare, and 

hearts of oak. 
Feigning to be as strong as country folk, 

3) 



Did walk — the tale is sad — did walk a 

mile ; 
The journey back did take a weary while, 
Nor once was any Junior seen to smile 
Till that dread walk was o'er and clean 

forgot. 

All dressed in tulle ys yonder pretty 

mayde 
Approach, accost her, she is not afraid. 
She'll tell you how last year two of her class 
Did try to frame a drinking-song. Alas ! 
Anacreon scarce would recognize himself 
In this their song (e'er wrote you one 

yourself?). 

" Atschu ! ktschu / / Berth''?, wine is new. 
Come, give us a glass ! Let each merry lass 

Go rollicking, 

Frollicking, — 
Bacchus is jolly king. 
We'll empty the glasses whatever we do. 

Whatever we do 

(The riotous crew !) 
We'll empty the glasses, and decanter too." 

Sure the Old Bailey s just the place for 

those 
Who call such dog'rel 'song.' Why just 

suppose 
Walt Whitman in his crudest of crude lines, 
Had given us such senseless, jingling 

rhymes ! 
No, 'tis too true, no poets have we here ; 
But all things else desirable, that's clear. 

IVil uSon of Song ne'er yield his laurel 
crown 

To some fair Junior? May we gain re- 
nown. 

Then, in some other way. The Hindoo 
saith, 



" Sa/i//^, berd in the hand two in the bush 
Is worth; " and we in this our "krpni/e^/," 
Ley not, nor utter aught that is not well, 
When we assert that if we cannot rhyme, 
There's plenty else we can do, " every 
time." 

" Cam'' a haii' help ye. Miss? you'se hurt 

yersel' ! " 
Said Sambo, when a Junior slipt and fell 
All in the muddy street of Boston town. 
With thankful heart she yielded ; it was 

done, — 
She stood once more her Junior feet upon. 
Now must my song have ending. I have 

told 
But little of my classmates' hearts of gold. 
Yet since I cannot never ending speak. 
My cosey ingle, heart o' mine, I'll seek. 
And as I go I'll sing, ye Junior class ! 
Heaven's choicest blessings on ye. Junior 

class ! 

(The maiden bows "adieu" amidst great 
* applause.) 

She bows — she's gone ! Down drops the 

sun. 
I must admit 'twas neatly done. 
Her words do echo in my heart. 
Her winning looks do make me start — 
Start off for hill or field or river. 
Come, stare not thus ! all good things must 
Have ending, like her song. I trust 
These winsome girls, these handsome girls. 
These rhyming, witty, wicked girls, 
Will catch me in their toils — oh never! 
Blow, bugle, blow ! this Junior's set me 

crying. 
The echoes answer, " Fie ! she was but 

lying." 



(84) 



3an Lectare Coar-^e. 



K. Pennell. a Biblical Lecture. — Especially interpreting the parable, 
" Cast your pearls before swine, and they will return to you after 
many days." And also introducing a new chapter in Deuteronomy, 
containing the Lord's Prayer. 

D. M. Strong. Table Etiquette. — With daily demonstration in the 

proper management of the teaspoon. 
C. C. B. What I Picked Up Yesterday. — A full and complete talk, 

covering every subject, country, and idea, from Maine to Jericho. 
H. L. Rich. Hair Restoration. — Agent for the Seven Sutherland 

Sisters. 
FrauLEIN von DER Kall. Alarm Clocks. — A confidential talk upon a 

species of alarm clocks, of which she has obtained the sole patent. 
S. Bond. Heathen Lands. — A lengthy, but interesting missionary talk, 

at the end of which a collection will be taken. 
H. Freeby. What / Knozv. — This lecture will necessarily be very brief. 
Miss Witherbee. Slang in All Lts Beauty. — This comparatively new 

line of research, as explained and illustrated by this able mistress 

of the subject, cannot fail to hold the eager attention of the 

audience. 
A. Richards. Temperance : Why / Became a Teetotaler ; or, the Danger of 

Frozen Pudding ''with." — After which opportunities will be given 

to sign the pledge. 

E. Orton. What / Learned at Mrs. Mackies. — Illustrated by stereop- 

ticon views. 

(85) 



Letter from an Old Girl 




Y DEAR LU: Alas! Such is fate! Who has ever 
experienced the unspeakable sorrow and woe that I am 
now feeling? No one in the annals of history, I am 
sure, ever half-dreamt of them, and yet it has fallen to my 
lot to be shut out of Paradise. (In other words, Lasell.) 
You will very probably be surprised to hear that I am not to 
take a post-graduate course, but that that same fate, in the shape of 
an invalid mother, has once more taken me in hand, and I am doomed 
to spend my days here at home, with only two or three balls a week 
to break the monotony. 

I don't remember a single week while I attended Lasell, except 
the one in which the Day of Prayer was celebrated, that we had less 
than four gayeties. 

I was so surprised, I remember, when I first heard of the reception 
to the new girls, and was told Jack Thornton, the president of the Junior 
Class at Harvard, was to be my partner. Wasn't it perfectly lovely of 
Miss Carpenter to take so much trouble for us? I believe she did the 
same thing the year you came, only you weren't lucky enough to 
have a Jack. 

He called on me every Sunday afternoon that year, and I used 
to get a five-pound box of candy every Wednesday. Once it didn't 

( 86 ) . 



come until Thursday, and Mrs. Strong was so worried about it. But I 
didn't mind. I used to get sick of candy, with that and the pound 
they gave us every other day. 

Will you ever forget that sleigh-drive with those four dear friends 
of Miss Witherbee's? I always thought she was grand to ask you and 
me, since she never could have guessed our fondness for Andover fellows. 

But our Senior Reception was the crowning joy. You Juniors had 
a fine time, staying out until one o'clock, — but, my dear, I never went 
upstairs until three, and then about ten fellows gave me an elegant 
serenade. They started to go at two, and Mr. Bragdon positively wouldn't 
let them. I don't suppose they minded, and I know I didn't. 

You don't know what you missed when you couldn't go to that 
german at Harvard. I did have the grandest time of my life. That 
night I divided every dance into three parts ; and ten men proposed, 
but I only accepted three. Mr. Bragdon thought that was such a 
huge joke. 

Mamma insists on my going to church once a month at least, 
and I can't get used to it, for I never went but six times at school 
the whole four years; and the difference between rising at ten, as we 
used to, and at seven, as I now do, is making me a very cross person. 
Well, dear, give my best love to all the teachers and girls, and when 
you are having such elegant times, think once in a while of 

Your most forlorn 

J • 



(87) 



Teacf)ers' i^eetm^g-. 



T 



IS on a winter evening, 

The winds have ceased to blow, 
And all around is laid 
A mantle of pure snow. 
A light streams from the window 

And sheds its glittering ray 
Upon the gathering darkness 

Of this brilliant winter day. 
How you would like to follow 
This radiant beam of light ! 
But woe to those who enter. 

For 'tis "teachers' meeting" night. 

Scene laid in the public office. Faculty seated in a circle around 
boxes containing booty from express packages, which they have not seen 
fit to deliver to the proper owners. 

Charlie (looking over list from Hackett to 
Hutchinson, and munching salted almonds) : 

To-night begins the H's ; 

Oh, may there ever be 
For these deserving H's 

A bulky " pkg." ^ 

Mary Patten W. (pressing Carpie's hand) : 
You say she is a Regular, 
The gentle, trusting lass; 
Although she is your favorite 
I cannot let her pass. 

Mademoiselle (handing chocolates to Delia) : 
These to a Prep belong ; 

Take them, my dear Delia, 
They'll help to make you Strong. 

' In order to notify the girls who have received flowers, chewing-gum, etc., of the arrival of 
said packages, Miss Crosby has invented the symbol " pkg.," it being a great time-saver. 

C 88 ) 





Billy (looking up for a moment from his book) 
Miss I., you say, got through? 

Oh, gimme for my Greta 
That stunnin"- hish-heeled shoe. 



NUTTIE (jumping up from the floor) : 

Friends and fellow-countrymen, 

I for those pills do speak ; 
Thus I shall have a remedy 



For all the aching teeth. 



Carpie 



I have here a petition — 
'Tis from the Junior Class ; 

Want to sport white caps and gowns, — 
Did you ever see such brass ! 

Billy (looking up from book a second time) : 
Hand me that there spruce gum, 

'Tis from the fungus tribe, 
Imported here through Africa, 

From two Greek works derived. 
Gum's an indorous substance 

Which exudes from the trees ; 
Chewing means to grind with teeth. 

And — (Charlie.) Come, give us a breeze! 

Delia. Last Saturday eve five callers stayed 

When the clock had stricken nine ; 
I've told their five young hostesses, 

That however they may pine, 
'Tis now too late to show remorse, 

For the clock has stricken NINE. 

Fraulein von der Kall: 

Right you are, dear lady ; 

If anything too mild 
Unto these frivolous maidens 

By Cupid's arts beguiled. 

Delia (whimpering) : 

A. W. zvill go to Boston, 
And, though I say her nay, 

(89) 







RckL£S 



She's bound to give us trouble, 
For she's a " little gay." 
(Wringing her hands at Charlie) : 

Oh, shove along that pickle, 

You are so very slow, 
I must be off to Boston, 

To chase that young girl's beau. 
You think he stole the ribbon? 
How wicked he must be ! 
All's o'er for said young lady. 
Him never more she'll see. 
And every other pupil 

That had a call that night, 
On future calling evenings 
Shall be kept out of sight. 

Charlie : Five girls were caught with candy 
Right on the public street 
That joins this town with Newton, — 

I never saw such cheek ! 
This can go on no longer. 
And we must take a list 

Of all who have bought candy, — 

Miss Ransom, you'll assist? 
Come now, ye jolly comrades. 
Let's have a little prance 

To end this "teachers' meeting," 

With Billie / shall dance. 
So, Carps and Billy canter, 
And all the rest join in, 
Till the slumbering girls in Seventy-one 
Are awakened by the din. 
NUTTIE (flushed and with sparkling eyes) : 
Now, just one more — a two-step; 

Prof.'s dancing is divine, — 
Would I'd always such a partner, — 

Come, let's fall into line. 
"Yes," quoth the stately Delia, 

" F"or the clock hath stricken nine." 




CaRPIE : 




(90) 



^ad Accident! 



YOUtlQ U/0/t\Pf( fij i-PSi-ll SE/T\l|V;iF?y B/iDiy IflJilFiED 




(Special to the Boston Tattler.) 

UBURNDALE, Mass., March i8. — A most singular acci- 
dent, and one that has caused a great deal of talk, 
happened at Lasell Seminary last night. A student who 
overheard the whole affair gives the following account of 



it: As usual, at nine o'clock, the girls came up to 
the water-tank to fill their pitchers for the night, and were talking and 
laughing so gayly that they did not notice a dark figure that crept into 
the background and stood watching them with an evil look in its eye. 
The laughing and talking continued until a noise behind them attracted 
the attention of the girls, and, turning, they beheld a tall, strong woman 
about to rush upon them. The girls fled in every direction, and all 
succeeded in reaching their rooms in safety. 

But the dark figure resumed its position and waited. About 9.25 
Miss Iphigenia Scraggs came up from the second floor with her pitcher. 
That unfortunate young lady had hardly stepped up to the water-tank 
when, without a moment's warning, she was pounced upon by the strong, 
powerful woman, who demanded her reasons for being there at that time 

(91) 



of night. Miss Scraggs endeavored to explain herself and throw oft the 
heavy hand grasping her arm. The frightened girls, listening in their 
rooms, say that, without waiting for any answer, she squelched, sat on, 
and even walked over the poor girl in a most cruel and heartless manner. 
Miss Scraggs was left lying senseless; but recovering consciousness, she 
dragged herself down to her own room, where she fell fainting on the floor. 
A physician was called in immediately. At first it was thought she was 
maimed for life, but later reports say she is much better and the 
injuries are not so serious as first thought. 

Miss Iphigenia Scraggs is a pretty young woman from the West, 
the only daughter of Mr. Croesus Scraggs, the millionaire, of Scraggsville, 
Utah, who, it will be remembered, made his money in wheat. He hap- 
pened to be in Boston on business, and was notified of the affair at once, 
and has begun suit. Talkem and Argem are his lawyers. 



(92) 



3entof Pfopf)ec^. 



G 



HE wind was howling fierce and fast 
Round a house both old and gray, 
Which had sheltered some years, in the days long past, 
Many girls, both young and gay. 

In this same old house I sat that night. 

And my thoughts were far away ; 
I saw a picture, fair and bright. 

And I smiled unconsciously. 

Twenty-one maidens, all in a row, 

Seniors of "Ninety-five." 
I asked in a voice, quiet and low, 

"Are all of these girls alive?" 

I heard, with unspeakable rapture, 

The answer, as he replied, 
"Alive? Yes, of that I'm certain. 

Shall I tell you what each one has tried? 

" Mabel Taylor is wedded to art. 

And happy she seems to be. 
She lives in Rome, with a sound, whole heart, 

Leaving many to mourn o'er the sea. 

" Anne Richards now speaks from the platform, 

Since she failed in her heart's desire : 
To win one who, from a life forlorn, 

Could raise her higher and higher. 

"Alice Andreesen's well married; 

She's a college professor's wife. 
They say Time for her has tarried. 

Has kept her from envy and strife. 

(93) 



" Hattie Freebey is living in France, 

An able successor of Worth. 
As of yore, she is fond of the dance. 

And captivates all with her mirth. 

"Sara Hayden has entered the bar; 

Has set up an office, too. 
She'll be sought from near and far; 

That girl could talk, and be true. 

" Mabel Lutes pursues still her music, 

But in quite a different way. 
Her lord is an organ-grinder, 

And has taught her the organ to play. 

" Helen Morris is not married yet. 

Though in Chicago she spends all her time. 
She tries hard the same man to get, 

But from her he struggles to climb. 

" Eleanor Clapp is confined, alas ! 

In an asylum for the insane. 
She saw her own shadow go past, 

One night, in a moon-lit lane, 

" Fan Fairchild was the first Lasell girl 

To adopt the great reform plan. 
Petticoats no longer does she furl. 

But wears trousers and coat like a man. 

" Elizabeth Stephenson's staying 

Quietly at home just now. 
In her church choir she leads the singing, 

Though I am sure I don't see how. 

" Dorothy Manning's an officer's wife, 

And lives in a fort far away. 
I hope she'll obtain the desire of her life, 

That together their hair may grow gray. 

(94) 



" Sara Bond was touched to the heart 

By the works of the Salvation Army. 
She joined its ranks, and well does her part. 
-Can be seen every day in some alley. 

" The Misses Murphy and Dickson 
Have a school, very fine and select. 

It is situated in Boston, 

Right under the shadow of Tech. 

" Grace Allen chose for her vocation 

Nursing; 'twas ever her forte. 
Her name is known for the creation 

Of a medicine called ' Health's Support.' 

" Bertha Butterfield is a countess, 

She married a noble of Spain ; 
She is very much loved for her kindness. 

And saves all she can from great pain. 

" Grace Loud and Mabel Sawyer 
Are two great stars of the stage. 

I am grieved at their departure. 

And prefer to turn over that page. 

" G. Bucknum lives in a poor-house 

Out in her native State. 
Her husband lost all his money, 

And died, leaving Gertrude to fate. 

" Carrie Steele is a jolly old maid. 
For she thinks there isn't a man 

Who could fill the place in her heart 
Which is now occupied by ' dear Nan.' 

" And last comes Belle, my daughter. 
Who is living at home with us now. 

She has had three husbands already. 
But a fourth one we will not allow. 

(95) 



A5 tf)e Da^ Cto^e^. 



.-g Board of Editors requested a Harvard man, who is a frequent caller 
^^y at Lasell, to write an article for the Allerlei, giving in concise terms 




his impressions of the school. He evidently thought the subject too 
common-place, and, being of a sentimental turn of mind, sent the following 
production. The Editors consider the poem somewhat beneath the high 
literary standard of their Allerlei, but not wishing to discourage him in his first attempt, 
have decided to insert it, and trust our readers will kindly pardon the many 
errors, — considering the scource : 

I lie and dream, here where the world is still, 

Of one my own; 

My own because his heart clings fast to mine, 
And ever will. 
He says that I am his — and he knows best — 

"While life shall last; " 

He carved it one day in this arching stone 
On which I rest. 
His life is teaching me to live anew, — 

My dear, brave boy ! — 

For all the day his spirit finds me fast, 
And keeps me true 
To him and to the girl he thinks I am ; 

Whose earnest hands, 

And heart, brimful of sympathy and joy, 
May bring heaven's calm 
On all the world around. 

I lie and dream. 

While the light fades. 

The words he carved are blazed with golden brands 
Until they seem 
To burn deep in my heart, — and then grow dim ; 

But I know well 

The strong fires of his heart-love know no shades ; 
And / love him. 

(97) 



Senior sStati^tiC^. 



NAME. 


Spare 

Time 

Spent. 


In love 
■with. 


Highest 
Avibition. 


Noted for. 


Needs. 


Aim in Life. 


Pet Ex- 
pressions. 


Grace L. Allen 


Studying. 


A rescuer. 


TO KNOW 


Nothing. 


A temper. 


To run an 
ambulance. 


Oh, dear! 


Alice Andreesen .... 


InN. 


Won't tell. 


Love for 
potatoes. 


More room. 


To be Frau- 
lein'sfavorite. 


Dash! 


Sara A. Bond 


Maiming 
herself. 


The sport- 
ing gentry. 


Modesty. 


Polish. 


To be pecu- 
liar. 


D— !! 


K. Belle Bragdon . . . 


X 


Brownies. 


Her Pa. 


Sweetening. 


To star at 
Keith's. 


Oh, Juice! 


Gertrude Bucknum . . . 


Writing to 

the blind 

poet. 


The Blind 
poet. 


Devotion to 

the Blind 

poet. 


The Blind 
poet. 


To be Mrs. 
Blind poet. 


Oh, Gee ! 


Bertha Butterfield . . . 


Loafing. 


Lasell. 


Boisterous- 
ness. 


Whirlwind. 


To be called 
But. 


Come off 

the Roz- 

berry. 


Eleanor R. Clapp . . . 


In the Lab- 
oratory. 


Her own 
jokes. 


Grin. 


A new bath 
robe. 


To see a 

ghost. 


Oh, wait on. 


Anne May Dickson . . 


With 
"Jude." 


Latin. 


Swipes. 


Hair. 


To play a 
banjorine. 


Oh, Glory! 


Frances V. Fairchild . 


With 
"El." 


A giant. 


Her stare. 


A chaperon 

among the 

rocks. 


To be a So- 
ciety belle. 


For ever- 
more. 


Hattie Freebey 


Laughing 
at others. 


Herself. 


Her winning 
ways. 


Bones. 


To instruct 
the Faculty. 


You great 
biglp. 


Sara Hayden 


Making 

Lasell 

pillows. 


Lawj'ers . 


Affectionate 
nature. 


A pipe. 


To be in har- 
mony with — 


Qiiid pro 

quo. 


Grace E. Loud 


Playing 
cards. 


C<n-bett. 


Fickleness. 


Reforming-. 


To be a flirt. 


D — !— ! — ! 


Mabel M. Lutes .... 


With 
mother. 


Her room 
mate. 






Neatness. 


To be a little 
wicked. 


To graduate 
in '95. 


Lawzee. 


Dorothy M. Manning . 


Quizzing 

the 
Juniors. 


Anybody. 


o 

•< > 

• 


Spooning. 


Common 
sense. 


To be queen 

of an army 

post. 


Grand 
Poulet. 


Helen B. Morris .... 


Giving her 
opinions. 


With all 
OTff«kind. 


Her appetite. 


A mother- 
in-law. 


To be mar- 
ried soon. 


Oh, Hen! 


Julia Murphy 


Grum- 
bling. 


Mrs. S. 


Good nature. 


Height. 


To have gen- 
tlemen cor- 
respondents. 


Expres- 
sionless. 


Annie E. Richards . . . 


Writing 
her journal. 


The 
clergy. 


Unceasing 
toil. 


A new -walk. 


To marry a 
millionaire. 


Oh, Hum ! 


Mabel W. Sawyer . . . 


With Loud 
G. 


Sullivan. 


Flippanc)'. 


A "quiet" 
friend. 


To be a star 
reader. 


There, 
now ! 


Caroline L. Steel .... 


Bathing. 


Her little 
Nan. 


Maiden 
friends. 


Animation. 


To get 
Wes(t). 


1 told you 
so." 


Elizabeth Stephenson . 


By the 
river. 


El nor. 


Voice. 


Toning 
down. 


To be a car- 
penter. 


Oh, lie 
down ! 


Mabel C. Taylor .... 


Hasn't 

any. 


Art. 


Her moods. 


A Saturday 

night without 

callers. 


To rival 
Sandow. 


Set awhile. 



Tf)e Tale of tl)e Tid\5. 



T 



WAS just about two months ago, 
A chill and rainy night, 
When I set out to call on her. 
In my best clothes bedight. 



Three minutes just to catch the train 
Ye gods ! how I did run ! 

I noticed not the puddles black, 
Though I'd forgot my gums. 



I reached the station just in time 
To see the train pull out, — 

Well, never mind particulars. 
They would not be devout. 



A half-hour by the station clock. 
To cool my passion blind ; 

I hated to lose so much time, — 
I wondered would she mind. 



Train came at last — a slow one, too 
It stopped at every station. 

While in my heart I swore at it, 
That darned accommodation ! 



At last, O joy ! my sorrows o'er, 

I saw a welcome sight, — 
The Sem's long length, all brightly lit, 

On its imposing height. 



I turned the corner and went on — 
But what in thunder's gone awry ? 

I had not found the steps, although 
I'd passed the lofty building by. 

(99) 



I turned me 'round, and back did trudge 

More slowly than I'd come ; 
And once again the corner gained, 

I stood with wonder dumb. 



No entrance, clearly, on this street; 

Said I, "I'll try the hill; " 
The east wind heard this wise resolve. 

And blew me to the sill. 

They took my card and scrawled her name 

Upon its willing back, 
Then I sat down to wait for her. 

And planned what jokes to crack. 

At last she came, with blushing face. 
And led me through the hall 

Into a parlor, crowded full 

With those who'd come to call. 

We looked around, but not a chair 

Seemed vacant ; men and maidens stopped 

Their eager talk, to gaze at us. 
Great Caesar ! How my spirits dropped ! 

She calm surveyed the many groups, 

Then " Ah ! " she uttered satisfied. 
And toward the farthest corner moved. 

Where two chairs stood, free, side by side. 



While telling her my funniest joke 

I gave a sudden start ; 
For there upon the sofa's back 

Was spread a work of art. 



'Twas soft and white, with ribbons bright 
Run through it here and there; 

I thought I'd like to take it home, 
And put it on my chair. 

{ 100 ) 



Then rang a bell, and all the men 
Jumped, and with speed departed ; 

I lingered ; strong a voice arose. 
From Doris' side I started. 



Before the next week had run out 
There came a note most chilling: 

'Twas from the keeper of Lasell, 
Accusing me of stealing. 



" I don't suppose your theft, young man, 

Was long premeditated, 
So please return the tidy, and 

You will be exculpated. 



" Do not come out to call again ; 

You would not be admitted ; 
A man who can't respect our rules 

Is not for calling fitted." 



When that curt note had been perused, 

I was an angry mortal. 
To think that / should be refused 

An entrance at that portal ! 



But calmer feelings soon returned, 
And " P. D. Q." was sent 

The tidy, with a humble note, — 
'Twould make a stone relent. 



" All's fair in love and war," said I ; 

So on next calling evening 
Chum s card was handed at the door, 

/ don't call that deceiving. 



'fc>- 



The keeper Strong did not catch on, — 

Let's trust she never will, — 
For I swipe by turns a different card, 
' And the place of each chum I fill. 

(lOl) 



Sreal^5. 



J. (seeing a young man approach). — "Surely I've seen that man before." 
"Yes," replied her room-mate, "he is a clerk in the West Newton drug store." 
Clippings from the Bible exam. : 

" John was born five or six months after Christ, in the fourth or fifth century 
A.D." • 

"Christ was born in the year looo A.D." 

" Salome asked for the head of John the Baptist in a manger." 
Distracted Special. — " Who does Baal refer to ? " 
Pres. of Soph. Class, knowingly. — " Why, to the man that rode a donkey, and was 

stopped by the Angel of the Lord." 
J. Aldrich (prompted by a brilliant Junior). — "The chief building in a county is 

the jail." 
J. Chandler (asked by Prof, in chapel to parse fine). — "Fine, finer, finest." 
Extracts from Prep.'s compositions : 

"The debris of Columbus are buried at Havana." 

" The grave of Longfellow is on the side of a hill, where he can see over a 
great part of the grounds." 

Expedite — "To perform the act of taking out a foot." 

Impediment — " That which puts a foot on." 
Pres. of Senior Class (looking at head of Raphael). — "Why, that woman has a 

mustache ! " 
Dr. Steele (in Civil Govt.). — "Next — I don't remember your name — what are 

taxes for? " 
Star of class. — "To support public schools." 

Dr. S. — "What advantage is that to me? I don't intend to go to school." 
Star (in a tone of despair). — "Well, there is the jail and poor-house." 
J. Walter (gazing at disturbance among the altos in Orphean Club). — "Nothing 

can be done until I have the attention of every one." 
E. Wilson. — " Just one moment, Mr, Davis, until I sneeze."* 

(102) 




3poon5. 



r Caroline Patton, 
^ Ellen Sanborn, 
( Fanny Fairchild, 

j Ella Ampt, 
\ Eleanor Clapp, 
I Ada Cadmus, 
\ Susie Montgomery, 

f Adelaine Allen, 
\ Mary P. Witherbee, 

( Clara Lewis, 

\ Winifred Conlin, 



j Mabel Taylor, 
) Florence Ray. 

J Blanche Swope, 
\ Sara Bond, 

f Elizabeth Stephenson, 
[Julia Hammond, 

[Blanche Kelley, 

\ Ella Wilson, 

j Celia Googins, 
[Helen Holman, 



Dorothy Manning, f Kittie Pennell, 

Gertrude Clarke, ) Ettiemay Pierson, 

J Maud Barker, f Alice Ball, 

( Blanche Swope, [ Grace Bliss, 

f Helen Morris, j Cara Sawin, 

( Nellie Carnahan, ( Bessie Latimer. 

(103) 




ne^(zr f^oraci 



£Lcle me f}. 



calve £1 a 



,./ 




le to call, aear ^iit rnurftn 
j^ncl her- hand a Soft pressure returned. 



or- rny jD^ei^i^iis cid^ance^ ^?ie'd Spurned 

UVo m€iUer -Whal w'orcls -Were I hen spa^ken, 
£y Lreu^/il a> Ir^ijht finish io her cheeks^ 
•she v\^hi€perecl"an%en" io the %iessin(rfs'' 



aa^'e l/i&se inlrudinq four WeeA'S. 



But <rci last, lilce all qoajd Iki^ias, Ihi'f endued 
JiiFul I hastened lay make mf ne.)cl ceiii^ 
nticifiri. cr'ffielidriij s^Oeel iA&iiahls (ii>f hhe purling 
^fi I hit I dear ! 




€ 'Sp&t I. 



my h opes v^&re all 6 ha i ie r<tfZ . 



i(sre s 7'b(w reason Ihe recfcson la &^<s K 
^\'t3d^f7% ^ hen J yJ(Lis her' oize. €>rhliJ cctll&i-^i 
^^^t^^-^^^^\ O'VsPy S he hcis ono r- it^e e^erf vv& 

^-— — — . 



e 





Prof. — " Let him but rise you felt the air was stirred by some electric 
current; 
He gave commands and left you with no choice 
But just to do the bidding of his voice." — E. W. Wilcox. 

Carpie. — "As I approach a second childhood 

I endeavor to enter into the pleasures of it." 

— Lady Montague. 
Delia. — "With haughty bearing and an eagle eye." — E. W. Wilcox. 
Billy. — "Heaps of huge words uphoarded hideousl\' with horrid sound 

though having little sense." — Spenser. 
Mary Patten Witherbee. — "How lady-like (!) " 
Fraulein. — "A narrow mind begets obstinacy." — Dryden. 
Dr. Steele. — "The help, the guide, the balm of souls perplexed." 

— Arbuthriot. 
CioS) 



Mrs. Curtis. — "Honey is sweet but the bee stings." 

NUTTIE. — "I always get the better when I argue alone." — Goldsmith. 

Mademoiselle. — "Whence of the nations came she?" 

Adeline Allen. — " Varium et mutabile semper femina." 

Miss Everett. — "Her smile is like a summer sunset." 

Miss Ransom. — ■ " I am resolved to grow fat and look young until 
forty." 

Joseph Hells. — "Bid me discourse — I will enchant thine ear." 

— Shakespeare. 
H. Orne Ryder. — "His manner which was soft." — (^Dickens.) 
J. Walter. — "O mighty mouth'd invention of harmonies!" — Tennyson. 
A. BlaisDELL. — "With thee conversing I forgot all time." — Milton. 
Miss (Gym) Adams. — "Kick, kick, kick. 

Till my legs are weary and sore ; 
Kick, kick, kick. 

Till I can't kick any more." 



'9S. 

M. T-YL-R. — "Ah me! when shall I marry me? 

Lovers are plenty but fail to relieve me." — Goldsmith. 

E. Cl-PP. — "Stay awhile that we may make an end the sooner," 

A. And-rs-n. — " 'Twas like a picture or a pleasing play 

To watch her make her toilet." 

r io6 ) 



A. R-CH-RDS. — "A mind not to be changed by place or time." 

— Milton. 

B. Br-GD-N. — "And a love look lights her eyes in the gloom, 

And the darkness is sweet with her sighs." 

F. F — RCH-LD. — "Oh, who would be a woman!" 

S. H-YD-N. — " High flights she had and wit at will, 

And so her tongue is seldom still. — Prior. 

H. Fr BY. — "Be calm in arguing; for fierceness makes ever a fault 

and truth discourtesy." — George Herbert. 
J. M-RPHY. — "A wise man changes his mind, a fool never." 
M, S-WY-R. — " Gude folk are scarce — tak' care o' me." 

M. D-X-N. — "I should have known what fruit would spring from such 

a seed." — Byron. 

H. M-RR-S. — " 'Tis not her sense, for sure in that 
There's nothing more than common, 
And all her wit is only chat. 
Like any other woman." — Scott. 

G. All-n. — "Be not all sugar or the world will gulp thee down." 
E. St-PH-NS-N. — "Her eyes are homes of silent prayer." — Tennyson. 
G. L — D. — "Long experience had made her sage." — Gay. 

B. B-TT-RF — LD. — "We laugh but little in our days; but are we less 

frivolous ? " — Beranger. 

D. M-NN-NG. — "People of a lively imagination are generally curious, 

and always so when a little in love." — Longfellow . 

C. St — L. — "She is in love. Were you ever in love?" 

( 107) 



S-R- B-ND. — She says ; yes, and worser ones. 

M. L-T-S. — "Can any mortal mixture of earth's mould 

Breathe such divine enchanting ravishment?" 
G. B-CKN-M. — "Every artist was first an amateur." — Emerson. 



'96. 

M. J-SS-LYN. — "A true friend is one soul in two bodies." — Aristotle. 
V. Ell-S-N. — "Thy voice is a celestial melody." 

E, W-TK-NS. — "I feel the stirrings in me of great things." 

— E. W. Wilcox. 

B. H-YW-RD. — " Obtuseness is the rule, not the exception." 

— Mine. Diiprcsiioy. 

N. C-RN-H-N. — "What woman can resist the force of praise?" 

H. H-LM-N. — "Small but sharp." 

M. SCH-B-RTH. — "In stature she was passing tall, 

And sparely formed and lean." — Scott. 

F. R-Y. — " She who says what she likes shall hear what she doesn't 

like." 
E. W-LS-N. — "I am nothing if not critical." — Shakespeare. 
J. H-MM-ND. — "Slow and steady wins the race." — Lloyd. 

K. P-NN-L. — "There was a little girl 
Who had a little curl 
Right in the middle of her forehead." — Longfellow. 

B. K-LL-Y. — "My life is one dem'd horrid grind." — Dickens. 

(io8) 



A. H-CK-TT. — '• My parts, my title, and my perfect 

Soul shall manifest me rightly." — Shakespeare. 

A. C-SH-NG. — "One vast substantial smile." — Dickens. 

E. L D. — "One ear it heard, at the other out it went." — Ckaneer. 

I. Br-NS-N. — "I see the beginning of my end, for I am almost 

starved." 

M. CR--KSII-NK. — "Arms and the man I sing." — Virgil. 

J. T-LL-YS. — "Some fair frozen lady whose blood is all too courtly 

to run quick." 

B. B--L-V. — " O, Voice! as night's bird soft to hear." 

R. Fr-NCH. — "Who goeth a borrowing, goeth a sorrowing." 
E. A-PT. — "What! cans't thou talk? Hast thou a tongue?" 
L. H-BB-RD. — "A villain, a liar, and a mean horse thief, 

All these and more make an editor-in-chief." 

L. M. H-BB-RD. --" The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers." 
A. Cl-RK. — "Speech is the index of the mind." — Seneca. 

C. S-W-N. — "It would talk — Lord how it talked!" 

— Beaumont and Fletcher. 

M. Av-RY. — "I have loved not the world, nor the world me." 

— Byron. 

J. Ch-NDL-R. — "Set your affections on things above, not on things on 

the earth." 

G. Engl-H-RT. — " Her face ! Oh, call it fair, not pale ! " 

L-MM — G — G-NS. — "What's in a name?" — Shakespeare. 

( 109^ 



J. F-TCH^ 

( — "Contented just to know each other near." 
H. F-TCh) 

S. H-YW-RD. — "Baling away ambition; by that sin fell the angels." 



W. C— NL— N. — " Smiling, frowning, evermore, 

Thou art perfect in love-lore." — Tennyson. 
L. Ev-NS. — "Too much learning hath made thee mad." — Shakespeare. 
E. F-RR-S. — "A life retired is well inspired." 
E. Bl — R. — "News hunters have great leisure with little thought." 

— Zimmerman. 
A. Wh-TM-N. — " An unconventional creature with no respect for persons, 

but a boundless love for 7nan\iind." 

A. W-RN-R. — " They fool me to the top of my bent." — Shakespeare. 
E. H-W-. — " Many things are lost for want of asking." 
G. J-N-s. — "Courage never to submit or yield." 

G. Cl-RK-. — " I'm quite ashamed ; 'tis mighty rude 

To eat so much, but all's so good." — Pope. 

G. W-SHB-RN. — "A modest manner fits a maid." 

I. K-SS-NG-R. — "I want to be an angel and with the angels stand." 

E. Gr-NT. — " Lips refusing out in words their mystic thoughts to dole." 

E. C-RLYL-. — "She thinks too much, such girls are dangerous." 

— Shakespeare, 

J. H-TCH-NS-N. — "Live for something." 

(no) 



'SB. 

K. Ch-PM-N. — "My will is law."— Tennyson. 

S. M-NTG-M-RY. — " Speaks an infinite deal of nothing." — Shakespeare. 

M. VV-LS-N. — "A dog is obeyed in office." — Shakespeare. 

L. Ch-PM-N. — "A shut mouth keeps me out of strife." 

A. C-DM— S. — "Jokes of all kinds, ready cut and dried." 

M. H-RT. — "Her hair was thick with many a curl that clustered 

'round her head." 
S. F-RNSW-RTH. — "You may pay too dear for your whistle." 
E. D — PH— . — "A fisherman's walk — twa steps and overboard." 
J. Myr-CK. — " Fresh as a flower." 

M. B-K-R. — " Her voice was deep, was low like the thunder afar off." 
M. M-Y-. — "Like a crane or a swallow so did I chatter." — Isaiah. 
M. G-R-. — "There affectation, with a sickly mien, 

Shows in her cheeks the roses of eighteen." — Pope. 
A. K-MB-LL. — 'All eye, all ear." — Young. 
E. W-RN-R. — "The word 'rest' is not in my vocabulary." 

— Horace Greeley. 
M. Gr-SW-LD. — "Be to her virtues very kind; be to her faults a 

little blind." — Prior. 

E. S — D-NT-PF. — "In thee all passion becomes passionless." — Tennyson. 
C. — RN-LU.- "The men all say Fm a rare jewel." 

R. M-RR — M. — "Chewing the cud of sweet and bitter fancy." 

— Shakespeare. 
(Ill) 



SP^^'P^S — "T'?6rG i5 5(T)3ll el?oie(^ \q rotti^i; applies." 



C. C-M-R-N. — " And the loud laugh that speaks the vacant mind." 

E. — RT-N. — "The over curious are not over wise." — ■ Massino;er. 

N. W-LS-N. — " The good are prone to tears." 

A. H— RV-Y. — " Blessings on thy simple head ! " — Dickens. 

B. Sm-TH. — " Bashfulness is an ornament to youth." 

C. H — TH. — "Is it for this they study — to grow pale, 

And miss the pleasure of a glorious meal?" — Dryden. 

N. B--CHT-L. — "Of studie took she most care and most hede." 

— Chancer. 
G. Bl-SS. — " Smiles in her eyes and simpers on her lips." 

G. Sw-P— . — "Most of the eminent men in history have been diminutive 

in stature." — Sydney Smith. 
L. P-R-SH. — "Fool, do not boast!" 
M. G-BS-N. — " Did squeak and gibber." 

E. R-MS-Y. — "I rise with the larks." 

C. L— W— S. — "I must be a very fascinating young girl. 'Tis not my 

fault, the men must blame Heaven." 
M. R — . — "Her voice was ever soft, gentle, and low. An excellent 

thing in woman." — Shakespeare. 
L. H-RT-N. — " 'Tis good in every case, you know, to have two strings 

unto your bow." 

F. Sl-T-. — "Save, oh, save me from the candid friend!" — -Canning. 
J. AldR-CH. — " Joke freely with the monkey, but don't play with his tail." 

(112) 



O. H — L-V. — "Laugh and grow fat." — Ben Jonson. 

F. L-RD, — " The only way to keep a secret is to say nothing." 

F. B-WM-N. — "A something so shy it would shame it to make it a 

show." — Lowell. 

M. B-RK-R. — " The worst fault you have is to be in love." 

— Shakespeare. 
N. W-LST-N. — " Sentimentally I am disposed to harmony, but organi- 
cally I am incapable of a tune." — Lamb. 
H. D-LZ— LL. — "Neat as a pin and blooming as a rose." 

C. P— TT— N. — "Alas! to-day I would give everything to see a friend's 

face." — Longfellow. 
L. App-L. — "An auger bores a hole, but this bore bores a whole 

community." 
M. D-NL-P. — "To wear long faces, just as if our Maker, 

The God of goodness, were an undertaker." — Pindar. 

M. M— IH. — "Vain, very vain, my weary search to find 
That bliss that only centres in the mind." 

C. H-ST-NGS. — "I am a gatherer and a disposer of other girls' 

stuff." 

B. F— RD. — "You have such a February face." — Shakespeare. 

C. W-TS-N. — "Appetite comes with eating." — Rabelais. 
R. Cl — V-L-ND. — "The artillery of her eye." — Cozvley. 

E. G-LL. — " The sports of children satisfy the child." — Goldsmith. 

M. B— RN-S. — " Upper rooms to rent she has 

Without furniture, but with gas." 



R. K-MB-LL. — " Her body was so slight it seems she could have floated 

in the sky." 
I. B-TT-Y. — "A mellifluous voice, as I am a true knight." 
M. L-ST. — "The wind bloweth where it listeth." — Bible. 

A. D — N-. — "The empty vessel makes the greatest sound." 

B. Sw-P-. — " Hang constancy ! You know too much of the world to be 

constant-sure." — Fielding. 
G. Sm-TH. — " She makes an excellent simpleton, ripe and strong flavored." 

— Shakespeare. 

A. ESP-Y. — " Girls blush sometimes because they are alive." 

— Mj^s. Browning. 
M. C-BB. — " You beat your pate and fancy wit will come. 

Knock as you please, there is nobody at home." — Pope. 
S. Eldr-DG-. — "She wears the rose of youth upon her." — Shakespeare. 
E. P — RS-N. — "There is no such flatterer as one's self." — Bacon. 
E. S— NB-RN. — "And your mouth — there was never to my mind such a 

funny mouth, for it would not shut." 
N. Br-GGS. — " Her ears laugh while her mouth goes by." 
E. B — TL-. — " Some people it is not recorded why they were born at all." 
L. Sh — R-R. — "Waiting and watching for a well-known footstep in 

the passage." 

B, R-P-R. — " Thy aspiring and ambitious thoughts." — Shakespeare. 

J. IngL--. — "Give thy thoughts no tongue." — Shakespeare. 

E. B-CKL-N. — "Assume a virtue if you have it not." — Shakespeare. 

(114) 



L. W-TH-R-LL. — "I loved you, and my love had no return. 

'And therefore my true love has been my death." 

— Skakespeaj'e. 

N. B-RR GHS. — " Her appetite for knowledge was insatiable." 

E. D-V-s. — " Too nice for a statesman, too proud for a wit." 
I. G-NN. — "I have a kind of alacrity for flunking." 

F. Cl-RK. — " You have an old trick of offending me." — Tennyson. 

A. B-LL. — " My life is dreary. 

He Cometh not, she said." 

E. Dr-SS-R. — "A simple child that lightly draws its breath." 

— Wordsworth. 

B. L-T-M-R. — "The pale complexion of true love." — Shakespeare. 
A. L-W. — " By name but not by nature." 



Orphean Club. — " Made still a blundering kind of melody." 

Mr. B. and Miss C. — "In every age and clime we see 

Two of a trade can ne'er agree." 

Callers. — "The hours are past too brief, had they been years; 
And him no mortal can detain." 

Spreads. — " Oh, sweet and strange are the sounds that range 
Through the chambers of the night ! " 

Allerlel — "A perfect structure of consummate art 

By artists builded and by genius planned." 
" A monument of crazed minds." 

f 115) 



Edith and Marie. — "Have always been at daggers drawing 

And one another clapper-clawing." 

Concentration. — "A certain sense of restlessness with rest." 
Former Edu'orS. — "Not long ago we trod the self-same way; 

Thou knowest how from day to fleeting day 
Our souls were vexed with trifles." 

Canoe Club. — "How they did sweat for the sweaters!" 

Mr. Rich's Table. — "The Lord helps those who help themselves." 

The Annex. — "They love the silent watches of the night." 

* 

Dakktown Ladies' Minstrels. — " Oh, what a difference in the morning!" 



4^ 



(ii6) 



Index. 







PAGE 


Lasell 'Building, [S95 . 




10 


Edward Lasell . . . . 




12 


Charles C. i^ragdon 




13 


Dedication . . . . . 




14 


Photograph of Class . 




17 


Board of Editors . . . . 




iS 


Preface ...... 




19 


Board of Trustees 




21 


Faculty 




22 


Classes ..... 




24 


'q8 Qiiotation 




25 


Register, Freshman Class . 




27 


Class Historj, '98 




28 


'97 Qiiotation 




31 


Register, Sophomore Class 




33 


Sophomore Class Historj . 




34 


'96 Qiiotation 


. 


37 


Register, Junior Class . 




39 


Historj of '96 




41 


'95 Qiiotation 




43 


Register, Senior Class 




45 


A Historj in Adjectives 




46 


Irregulars .... 




48 


In Memoriam 




50 


S. D. Societj Officers . 




51 


S. D. Banjo, Mandolin, and C 


juitai 




Club . " . 




52 


Members of S. D. Societj- . 




53 


S. D. Glee Club . 




54 


Lasellia Club Officers . 




55 


Lasellia Banjo, Mandolin, and C 


Tuita 




Club 




• 56 


Members of Lasellia Club . 




57 


Lasellia Glee Club 




• 58 



Orphean Club ..... 59 

Piano-forte Qiiartets .... 60 

'Lasell Leaves" ..... 61 

Christian Associations ... 62 

Dress Cutting — Millinerj ... 63 

Cooking Classes ..... 65 

Studio 66 

Lasell Battalion ..... 67 

Swimmers ...... 68 

Canoe Club ...... 69 

Lasellia Club Banquet ... 70 

S. D. Banquet ..... 70 

Class Night 71 

junior Entertainment .... 72 

Literary 73 

Whj I Came to Lasell ... 74 

A Coin Conference . . - . . 75 

Photograph of Churches ... 78 

Sundav Table Talk .... 79 

Lasell Song . . . . . . 81 

The Juniors 82 

Sun Lecture Course .... 85 

Letter from an Old Girl ... 86 

Teachers' Meeting .... 88 

Sad Accident ..... 91 

Senior Prophecj ..... 93 

Snap Shots ...... 96 

As the Day Closes .... 97 

Senior Statistics ..... 98 

The Tale of the Tidy .... 99 

Breaks ....... 102 

Spoons ....... 103 

"I know I shall never forget thee". 104 

Roasts 105 



(117) 



Index to (Jdverti^ement^. 





~ 






PAGE 


Atwood, H. & R 127 


Babb, Edward E., & Co. 






122 


Bent & Bush 






1^5 


Boston Engraving Co. 






128 


Boston & Albany R.R. 






4 


Bouquet, The : 






120 


Brazer, George S. 






120 


Capstick, Win. 






122 


Chickering, Ehner 






123 


Cobb, Aldrich, & Co. . 






5 


Cook, T. D., & Co. . 






114 


Dame, Stoddard, & Kendall 






126 


DeWolfe, Fiske, & Co. 






125 


Dreka Engraving House 






126 


Eddy, C. F., & Co. . 






119 


Estey Organ Company 






12S 


Goldthwait, Joel, & Co. 






127 


Hearn, Charles W. 






127 


Hollander, L. P., & Co. 






7 


Jenkins, O. A., & Co. 






8 


Johnson, George E. 






125 


Lasell Pins . 






124 


Lawrence, Wilde, & Co. 






119 



Lewis Confectionery 
Locke, Isaac, & Co. . 
Long, Thomas, & Co. 
Melody, T. F. 
Noyes Brothers 
Oliver Ditson Company 
Pickering & Ferguson . 
Piuta, V. A. . . 

Putnam & Spooner 
Rockwell & Churchill Press 
Seaver, Chandler . 
Shattuck & Jones 
Springer Brothers 
Stickney & Smith 
Stowell, A., & Co. 
Sturtevant & Haley 
Swan, Newton, & Co. 
Thorndike, Joshua 
Wadsworth, Howland, & C 
Ward & Co. . . 

Wethern, George M. . 
Whitney's Handkerchiefs 
Wright, Albert F. 



PAGK 
120 
124 
127 
119 
2 
2 
120 
120 
124 
122 
120 
123 

3 

125 
121 
128 
126 
123 
123 
119 
120 
6 
120 



118) 



Jan. 10. Lecture on Greek and Roman Mythology. 
Jan. 17. Lecture on Landscape in Literature, Nature and Art. 



W 



— €) 



ai^d &^ Co. 




13 



Carriage 
Painting 
Repairing 



IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 



ELM, COR. WASHINGTON STREET, 

NEAR CITY HALL, 

WEST NEWTON. 

Best Work . . . 
at Lowest Pi'ices. 



T. F. MELODY, 



AUBURNDALE, 

Telephone 65-3 



= isp» I«p» 



Boarbing, j ^^^^ 
Baiting, | saie 



StaMe 



£fist ejjsn 



Carriages a Specialty 

Also, fine Coach Horses for sale. 



C. F. Eddy & Co. 



DEALERS IN 



^ t 



COAL, WOOD, 

HAY, STRAW, FLOUR, GRAIN, 

FEED, 

LIME, CEMENT, DRAIN 
PIPE, ETC. 



) \ 



Washington St., near R. R. Crossing, 
WEST NEWTON, 

LAWRENCE, WILDE 
& CO. 

^anufaeturefs of 
FlHST-CLiHSS 

pQrnitttre 
AND Interior 
Decorations 

^los. 38 to 48 Copnhill, 



Wm. H. Hull. 
Geo. B. darrow. 
C. P. Dyer. 
Horace W. Stickney. 



BOSTO]^. 



("9) 



Jan. 21. Origin of the U. T. C's. 



Jan. 24. Prof, discovered that he can trust only two girls out of forty-nine 

Jan. 31. Day of Prayer. 



V. A. Pluta, 



'^■^^_/■^fc/■« 



2)egi£LJ2= Iprovislons, 

Cor. of Auburn and Lexington Sts., 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



FO 



« FKE PIILLIBY^ 



ISIT 



21 ahd 25 Tem|3le Place. 

STHICTLiY pir^ST-CLiHSS GOODS AT 
POPULiflf^ Pf^rCES. 

HLL tlrie latest riovelties iq FINE ffilL- 
LINERY are stiowq oq our couriters 
as sooq as iq Paris, Loqdori or Berliri 
n^ar^et. Your patronage is respectfully 
solicited. GEORGE M. WETHERN. 



LADIE5_ 



WISHING TO PURCHASE THE CORRECT 
STYLES IN 

-# MILLINERY s.^. 

AT LOWEST PRICES, SHOULD 
CALL AT 

... THE BOUQUET 

134 Tremont Street, Boston, Mass. 
Special Attention given to IWourning Orders. 

ALBERT F. WRIGHT, 

IRegistercb 

(by examination) 

IPbarmacist 

Dispenser to Lasell Seminary. 

NICKERSON'S BLOCK, - Next Door to Post Office, 
WEST NEWTON. 



And Jobbers in 



PiGKering and Fepoo, 

gnmrnission ]y[firGhants, 

Butter, 

Cheese, 

STALL, 89 QUINCY MARKET, 

BOSTON. 



E. A. PICKERING. S. S. FERGUSON. 

Telephone Connection 



CHANDLER SEAVER, 



p ORTRflIT HUD LPPSCUPE P HOTDGRPPHER, 



West Newton, Mass. 



358 Centre St., iRewton. 

5ii;ii^ George S. Brazer, 

(Successor to Odin Fritz.) 



(120) 



Feb. 2. Prof, taught Civil Government. 



Feb. 4. Juniors made their debut. 
Feb. 7. Lecture on " The Foot." 



22 of the most . . /1TiJ^l.^ FOR WEDDINGS, 

i r^i I T^l2 birthdays, 

complete Departments ^kj 7 111 zTl 

^•^ WV^^' ANNIVERSARIES, 

with up=to=date goods 

V , *ffi» «ffi» *85» 

^ (? • • • 



DIAMOND Solitaire, Twin, $25.00, $50.00, 

and $75.00 

DEPA1^TMF"NT Circlet Diamond Rings $100.00 

.StatioKery ] (> \ EKgraVir\g 

De|DaKmehvt j ^ { card, society, and 

High=CIass Stationery S ^ \ Wedding Work a 

•' i) "' 
from the best makers ? ▼: S Specialty 

"..r.-i. 

A. STOWELL & CO., 24 Winter Street, BOSTON. 



lEWIS, ^ 



o 



pnvc Cbocolatee 
anb Bonbons, 

5ce*Cteam Soba. 



Wasl^ipgtop St., cor. Wir^ter, BOSTON. 

(121) 

Feb. 9. Girls went to Natick on a spree. 



Feb. 14. St. Valentine's Day celebrated by Shakespeare exam. 
Lecture on Browning's Musical Poems. 



W 



mUfS) 



THE 

rocKWeLL <^ cHUfjcHiLL 

PRESS 

41 ARCH ST., BOSTON. 



19 



Makers of Fine Books like the "Allerlei, " etc. 



WM. CAPSTICK, 



Plorist, 



^ 



Aspen Avenue, 



Auburndaie. 



imie&Mng Dccorattons an& jfuneral 
Bmblems at sbortest notice. 

ALSO, 

BEDDING PLANTS, 
CUT ROSES and CARNATIONS, 

A SPECIALTY. 



Bcivard C. P>abl) er Co., 




Scalers in 



School ^oo^'^ 



anb 



00^ 



School Supplies 






Of everi? bescriptton* 



25 Arch Street, 



Boston, Mass. 



(122; 



Feb. 17. Girls went to see General Booth. 



Feb. 20. Memory lecture. 
Feb. 21. Lecture on ^A^endell Phillips. 



J£ 



epeciall^ Convenient 



for Xasell ! 



-9 



OUR NEW STORE 

In the GRUNDMANN STUDIOS, Clarendon St. 

near St. James Ave. and Huntington Ave. 

Station on B. & A. R. R. 

We shall carry there a full line of 

. Hvti0t'0 flDaterials 

^ anD 



2)faftina Supplice. 



PICTURE FRAMING A SPECIALTY 

o o o 
WflDSWORTH,HOWLHP,&GO. (Iprp'd), 

Grundmann Studios, Clarendon St., 
82 & 84 Washington St., Boston. 

Catalogue Mailed Free 




^fiotograpfier 



fi 



LL students at Lasell are entitled 

to our regular SCHOOL Rates 

for Cabinet Photos. The Aristo 

finish being used when requested. 



21 West Street, 



BOSTON. 



JOSHUA THORNBIKE, 



DEALER IN 




Mutton, 

Lamb, 

Veal, 



STALLS 3 and 5, 



NEW FANEUIL HALL MARKET, 



BOSTON. 



Shattiick & Jones, 



fWWW 



WHOLESALE, 
RETAIL 

AND COMMISSION DEALERS IN 



OCEHN, LHKE 

©©©©© 




HND RIYEB 



Fresh Salmon and Trout 
Specialties. 

No. 128 FANEUIL HALL MARKET, 
BOSTON. 

Telephone EDWARD B. NEWTON 

Haymarket 775. 



(123) 



Feb. 22. Colonial Dinner. 



Feb. 23. Shakespeare-Dickens Masquerade. 
Feb. 27. Girls at Billy's table gave up talking about the food for Lent. 



«> 



Heserbeb 
for t|)e 



iWakfts of ti}E ilasell pins. 



Students' Outfit. 




BRASS and WHITE BEDSTEAD, 

WIRE SPRING, 

CURLED HAIR MATTRESS, 

COMPLETE, $20. 

Putnam & Spooiier, 

344 BOYLSTON ST., BOSTON. 



XaMc6' 



Located in the midst of 
the Shopping District. 



Three Large Attractive 
Dining-Rooms, Dainty 
Dishes, Nice Service. 



Xuncb, 




TLbc most reasonable 

3f (rstsClass place to Xuncb. 

Convenient to Q:beatres. 



23=31 Avon Street, 



BOSTON. 



Cake, Bonbons, Salted Almonds, and 
Fancy Novelties at our counter. 



T. D. COOK & CO., Caterers. 




Fruits m YegeiaDies 




1bot Ibouee iproDucts H H 

(^ (} ant) (Tanncb 600^0. 

Special attention given 
HOTEL, CLUB, and FAMILY ORDERS. 

ISAAC LOCKE & CO, 

97, 99 and 101 FaneuJI Hall Market, BOSTON. 



(124) 



March 8. E. B. met G. P. D. 



March 14. Lecture on Westminster Abbey. 
March 28. Lecture on the War — see? 



BENT & 
BUSH 



Ibatters 
ana Spurriers 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Caps 



IN ALL SHAPES. 



387 
Washington 

Street, 
BOSTON. 




in all Departments of 
Literature _ 

can bE found at our stnrE. 
ThE largEst assnrtnnEnt in 
BDBtnn nf thE papular and 



standard authnrs. 



AIed a 



largE varJEty at spEcial raduc- 

tions. LargE variEty nf BiblEs, 

PrayEr Bnaks, BanklEts, Etc. 

We are noted for low prices. 

^f ^^ ^^ 

De Wolfe, Fiske & Co., 

Zbc Brcbwa^ JBooftstore, 

361 and 365 Washington Street, 

BOSTON. 



GEORGE E. JOHNSON, 



DEALER IN 



Pay, M, aDl Feel, 



LEXINGTON STREET, 
AUBURNDALE. 



TELEPHONE. 



C tickney & Smith, 

134 BOYLSTON STREET, 
BOSTON, MASS. 



XaMes anb fiDieeee 

Suits, 
miaiete 
ant) ffurs. 

10% Discount allowed all College 
Students. 



(125) 



April 2. Chicken patties for dinner. 



April 4. Reception held — chiefly in the library. 
April 8. Darktown Lady Minstrels. 



0)0 ifo 0) o (fo oyfii^o 'OE'To "^Olc* vAC^ vAC" °r^° !°°/^° f° 



DREKA 

Fine Stationery and Engraving House, 

1121 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 



COLLEGE INVITATIONS 
CLASS STATIONERY 
SOCIETY STATIONERY 
COATS OF ARMS 



WEDDING INVITATIONS 
VISITING CARDS 
MONOGRAMS, ADDRESSES 
MENUS & DINNER CARDS 



STEEL PLATE ENGRAVING FOR COLLEGE ANNUALS. 

Heraldry and Genealogy a specialty. 
Coats of Arms painted for framing. 



0)° 1(0 0)° 1(0 0)° iTo °)° 'fo'^OS' °)° <fo °)° 1(0 v^'C^ v.^C^ 



Swan, Newton & Co. 

DEALERS IN 

Poaltpy ^ 
Wild Game and 

F=OR SHIRRING. 

Stalls : 
HOS. 18 m 20 FUNEDIL HALL MWl. 

TELEPHONE No. 924. 



HENRY SWAN. 
C. F. KIDDER. 



S. B. NEWTON. 

J. H. RICHARDSON. 



ESTABLISHED I800. 



-^ 



Daine, Stoddard 8t l^endall. 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS 

Pocket Book^, Dre^^it\g Ca^e^ 
Toilet 5viKclrie5 

Table and Pocket CatletT^y 

Op^ra ahc| Tielcl (jla^^e^ . . . 
TI\enTvolTve-ter5 . 

Photogpaphic jWatemal 



1^ 



Fancy Hardware, Dog Collars, Thermometers, Gymnasium Supplies. 

374 Washington Street, Boston. opp. BromHeid st. 

(126) 



April 10. Easter Vacation. 



April ig. Seniors appeared in caps and gowns. 
April 20. Juniors happy. 



THOMAS LONG & CO., 

77 Summer St., Boston. 



IMPORTERS 
AND MANUFACTURERS. 



Novelties ! l 

in Jewelry^ of all kinds* 

Gold - - Solid and Plated, 

Silver - - Sterling and Plated. 

HAIR ORNAMENTS of every 
description. 

Sterling Silver, Tortoise Shell, Etc., Etc. 



Thomas Long, 

BOSTON. 



Frank F. Davidson, 
auburndale. 



The Photographer to 

Lasell Seminary, 

'94 and '95, 

IS 

Charles W. Hearn, 

392 Boylston Street, 



B 



BOSTON. 

Y nature of contract with the 
class '95, all students of 
the Seminary are entitled to 
Special Discount rates 

The high standard of our work 
is well known Special attention 
paid to " Posing" and Finishing. 



H. & R. Atwood, 

PLANTERS AND wholesale 
DEALERS IN 

Providence River 
and Virginia...,., 

—^^ Ousters 

ALSO 

All the Varieties of Native Oysters. 

49 GOmmERGKIL aijd 56 GLI)(TO)i STREETS, 
146 m 148 HTLflNTIG HVENDE, 

BOSTON. 

Joel Goimiiwaii & Co. 



Fine Carpets 

and 
Oriental Rugs. 



162 to 169 Washington St., 
BOSTON. 



(127) 



April 24. Mrs. Strong did the editor-in-chief's mending. 



April 25. Another reception. 
April 29. Spring cleaning. Ray and Bronson hoed. 

EsTEY Organs. 275,000 

^■^^ A --^ A Vi^ ^V^f ^f ^^^ Have been Hade an( 



Our New Catalogues show many New Styles for 



Parlor^ Students^^ Church and Chapel Use^ 



that are in advance of all competition. 

Built upon the PATENTED ESTEY PHILHARMONIC 
SYSTEM, has reached the highest pinnacle of free 
reed development. This organ has two manuals, 

ten registers, pedal bass, and all the latest improved mechanical accessories, and is just the 

instrument for Church or Chapel use. 



Our new GtiurcH Plononom, 



NEXT THE TOP! 

i i i 



Estey Pianos. 



There are one or two pianos which have a world-wide reputation. They are very high-priced 
and beyond the reach of most buyers. The moment you leave the ranks of these costly pianos, 
and come to the next highest grade of excellence, you find the ESTEY PIANO standing at 
the head of the great list of popular instruments, and sold at a price which is available for all. 



SEND FOR CATALOGUES. 



ESTEY ORGAN COHIPflNY. 



159 TREMONT STREET, 
BOSTON. 



Established 1826. Telephone Connection. 

STURTEVANT k HALEY 
BEEF and SUPPliY 

COMPANY. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Beef, porR, %avt> ant) Ibams. 

Smoked and Dried Beef, 
Smoked, Corned and Saltpetred 
Tongues, 

Tripe, Sausages, Etc. 

38 and 40 FANEUIL HALL MARKET, 
BOSTON. 

Slaughter House, No. 11 Brighton Abattoir. 




(128) 



May 4. S. C. N. F, circus came to town. 













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